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657780 Posts in 9259 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 71 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: 24 frames per second: new movie thread  (Read 41167 times)
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #250 on: Jun 21, 2008, 11:43:39 AM »

I was pretty suspicious of its quality, so I just downloaded the bitch. I feel cheated for spending the time and allowing it to occupy 700megs of space on my hard drive. Seriously, seriously fucking awful. We were all drunk and playing cards and I don't think anyone was paying much attention, else it'd probably have been turned off. Just bad, bad, bad. Like I said, I can't believe the Onion lent its good name to such a stinking pile of crap.


xpost to richard
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coldforge
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« Reply #251 on: Jun 21, 2008, 12:26:23 PM »

Michael Nyman wrote one of the canonical books on experimental music. It's kind of dogmatic and exclusionary, but my paperback is set in a really nice typeface, so I'm torn.
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Greg Nog
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Posts: 21629


« Reply #252 on: Jun 21, 2008, 12:47:51 PM »

I think that Ravenous mostly failed at being scary or funny, but that it succeeds as a small-scale meditation on American eating habits as they dovetail with colonialism and unspoken cultural normativity about manhood. 

What I love most about the movie is that the main character is The Good Guy, and is so resistant to gaining power by destroying other people, yet the movie never settles on a happy moral ending for him making the right moral choice; all of the power, glee, and surety come from those who behave progressively more sociopathic.  On an ideological level, I like that the movie takes such a grim view of expansionism, masculinity, and Will To Power.  On a moment-to-moment level, I find myself enthralled by Robert Carlyle and Jeffrey Jones's performances, the creepiness of the score, and the beauty of the landscape.

I dunno, I think the whole thing is sorta quietly poetic, sad, and beautiful, and just happens to have some weird flourishes that feel like last-ditch efforts to shove it into the Horror genre.
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diesel_powered
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« Reply #253 on: Jun 21, 2008, 12:50:15 PM »

It always seemed like one of those movies that was one thing, but the marketing department thought it would never survive if it wasn't marketed as something completely different.
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Andrew_TSKS
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« Reply #254 on: Jun 21, 2008, 05:22:02 PM »

More to the point, though, really, mad props to Criterion for restoring Blast of Silence. I'd long wanted to see this 1961 existentialist pulp-noir film about an Ohio hitman strolling NYC at Christmastime while waiting to do a job, and it met my hopes--the thing is as bitter as Detour, with insanely hardboiled second-person narration ("you hate parties . . . you want a woman, buy one. In the dark, so she won't remember your face." I also liked the description of one guy as having "a moustache to hide the fact that he has lips like a woman. The kind of face you hate." Lots of hate in the movie, really--it's sort of like Le Samourai but with Travis Bickle), and an incredible gritty allure. A neat bonus feature also retraces the film's steps and shows how the locations have changed since then.

oh my god. this is now #1 in my queue. between your description and a writeup i seem to remember from the back pages of ed brubaker's "criminal" (if you aren't reading this comic, you should--neo-noir crime comics with half a dozen or so pages in the back of every issue featuring essays about classic noir films by comic writers such as steven grant and charlie huston. patton oswalt even did one. in fact, upon googling, it turns out that he is the one who wrote about "blast of silence"), i'm way sold on this movie.
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Andrew_TSKS
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« Reply #255 on: Jun 21, 2008, 05:22:56 PM »

That was the only thing that made me mad about the movie:  "That doesn't work!  That's just not scientifically possible!  I woulda been eating people LONG ago if it worked!"

That aside, though, I absolutely loved that movie.

isn't there an h.p. lovecraft short story based around this same principle?
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Andrew_TSKS
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« Reply #256 on: Jun 21, 2008, 05:24:55 PM »

It always seemed like one of those movies that was one thing, but the marketing department thought it would never survive if it wasn't marketed as something completely different.

hah, like the tv commercials that pushed "eternal sunshine of the spotless mind" as a heartwarming romantic comedy called "eternal sunshine"?
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Wally
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Posts: 9184


« Reply #257 on: Jun 21, 2008, 07:30:32 PM »

I watched the first half of Stop-Loss earlier, and in a few minutes I'll watch the second half. Thus far, it's not too bad although not especially ground breaking.
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Wally
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Posts: 9184


« Reply #258 on: Jun 21, 2008, 07:54:07 PM »

For those of you who have seen Somersaulter and/or Candy, but have yet to be convinced that Abbie Cornish is an intense motherfucking actor, Stop-Loss might help you out.
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guanajuato
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Posts: 1787


« Reply #259 on: Jun 22, 2008, 01:33:58 AM »

That was the only thing that made me mad about the movie:  "That doesn't work!  That's just not scientifically possible!  I woulda been eating people LONG ago if it worked!"

That aside, though, I absolutely loved that movie.

isn't there an h.p. lovecraft short story based around this same principle?

isn't there always
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edison
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Posts: 4837


« Reply #260 on: Jun 22, 2008, 05:47:04 AM »

Whit, there's a huge Jess Franco retrospective at the Cinémathèque in Paris. I'm sad you're not around, because then that would surely motivate me to take a weekend to go check out some of these films. As it is, I have way too much work and have no Paris trips planned in the next future.

Oh man, that's too bad--I was going to mention this about a month ago and urge you to go! I'm quite in awe of it, myself, and I wonder if it will precipitate a critical revaluation of Franco beyond those of us who are already obsessed with the man (which maybe seems unlikely on the surface, but then filmmakers like Sam Fuller and Edgar Ulmer--not to mention Douglas Sirk--were only later rescued from marginalization among the tastemakers).

If you do for any reason go, I recommend Les Gluotonnes (July 22), Le Miroir Obscene (July  20), and--probably his signature film--Venus in Furs (June 21). Also Les Nuits Brulantes de Linda on July 28, because I can't find a copy of that in the U.S.   

I should have known you knew about this! Thanks for the recommendations anyway. I do think my current workload makes a trip to Paris fairly unlikely in June/July, but if I do end up going, I'll keep those in mind.

I saw an excellent Israeli film yesterday (Beaufort) On Friday I had the following depressing conversation at work during a coffee break with a colleague:
C: so what are you doing this weekend?
me: oh, resting, and I'll try to catch a couple of movies in the Israeli film festival
C: Israeli? Isn't that boring?
me: No.

(awkward minute-long silence)
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Andrew_TSKS
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« Reply #261 on: Jun 22, 2008, 01:22:26 PM »

did i mention that i saw "the assassination of jesse james by the coward robert ford" a couple days ago? well, i did. i loved it. it's hard to say exactly what was going on with it, because at points it was more like the sort of dark, quiet spaghetti westerns that i love, but at other points it was more the sort of intense character study that i see in movies like "the godfather" or "there will be blood". i definitely ended up sympathizing with robert ford more than jesse james, and the way the movie ended was particularly depressing.
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Wally
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Posts: 9184


« Reply #262 on: Jun 22, 2008, 07:39:52 PM »

Stop loss wasn't half bad. My above opinion stands, as whilst there wasn't any great originality, and the film didn't have the emotional wollop that Pierce's first film did, it was still a reasonably solid bit of work. And Cornish, and the big dude from "A guide to recognising your saints" were pretty great to watch, as was the third rock kid whose part seemed as if it had been cut down a little bit. Ryan Philippe was the weakest link, but he didn't make a complete ass out of himself either, the fact that his arc was a little too pat and sentimental at times and as it was the main part of the film meant that I wouldn't go around recommending this film willy nilly. But I did think they got the small town friendship thing done in a way that wasn't trite, and treated drunk and violent soldiers with respect without glorifying them.
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G.C.R
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« Reply #263 on: Jun 23, 2008, 12:46:46 AM »

did i mention that i saw "the assassination of jesse james by the coward robert ford" a couple days ago? well, i did. i loved it. it's hard to say exactly what was going on with it, because at points it was more like the sort of dark, quiet spaghetti westerns that i love, but at other points it was more the sort of intense character study that i see in movies like "the godfather" or "there will be blood". i definitely ended up sympathizing with robert ford more than jesse james, and the way the movie ended was particularly depressing.

Shit dude, have we talked about "The Great Silence" yet?

I watched "Limbo" last night. I'd seen it when it first came out, and remembered thinking then that it was frustrating, because I really should have liked it, but didn't quite. it really made me think though, because I found the first half, which is all concerned with their romance and what not, pretty irritating, but loved the second 'survival in the wilderness' half so much, but thinking on the script, I felt like there was no way you could have that second half without having the first half left pretty much intact. Really though, as a film, its sort of a genius cross over appeal, in that it would be (and was) completely loved by 40-60 year old middle class white women who like feel good arthouse movies, but I think that its appeal is wider than most of the films that fall into that category.
I think David Strathairn is very sexy in it too.   
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Wally
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« Reply #264 on: Jun 23, 2008, 10:10:27 AM »

I kinda love that film, but then I do fall in the camp that believes John Sayles can do no wrong. I've not seen Limbo in a while, but I'll have to remedy that with a mini-Sayles festival sooner or later. I may actually be 40-60 year old middle class woman, as I thought the first half was vastly more interesting then the second half (although I still thought the second was grand), and agree that each half is needed to give the other added weight. I'd argue that a good number of Sayles's films can be split in two, although seldom as clearly as is the case in Limbo. On the one hand he'll have a domestic thing going on, and on the other something seemingly bigger and stranger.
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sassymcassface
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« Reply #265 on: Jun 23, 2008, 11:26:29 AM »

i saw the hulk last night, and my only response to it was an overwhelming need to smash.

i yelled at some jerks on the bus, so i feel like i did in fact learn something from the movie.
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Andrew_TSKS
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« Reply #266 on: Jun 23, 2008, 12:03:59 PM »

did i mention that i saw "the assassination of jesse james by the coward robert ford" a couple days ago? well, i did. i loved it. it's hard to say exactly what was going on with it, because at points it was more like the sort of dark, quiet spaghetti westerns that i love, but at other points it was more the sort of intense character study that i see in movies like "the godfather" or "there will be blood". i definitely ended up sympathizing with robert ford more than jesse james, and the way the movie ended was particularly depressing.

Shit dude, have we talked about "The Great Silence" yet?

don't believe so, but i'm aware of it. spaghetti western, right? i saw a documentary on spaghetti westerns a while back and wrote down a whole lot of titles to check out, but most of the damn things aren't available on dvd in the usa right now. bummer.
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Ewan
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Posts: 22


« Reply #267 on: Jun 23, 2008, 02:45:22 PM »

I saw a great film called "Into Great Silence" about monks at the Chartreuse monastery. It was really wonderful, slow burn passage-of-the-seasons kinda stuff, you could even use the word "meditative" and, well, no you would be being pretentious, but hey it's about monks. Plus, they didn't manage to mention the liqueur once (does anyone drink it? are you a goth or what?). Though there was a nice scene with one of the monks doing the accounts. Anyway, great film. Then they saddled up their horses and rode into the sunset.
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Greg Nog
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« Reply #268 on: Jun 23, 2008, 03:00:03 PM »

Plus, they didn't manage to mention the liqueur once (does anyone drink it? are you a goth or what?).

I just tried it for the first time a few months ago, and kind of fell in love with it.
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TeddyTreebark
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Posts: 83


« Reply #269 on: Jun 23, 2008, 03:28:18 PM »

Has anyone seen Daft Punk's Electroma? The dvd is coming out soon and I'm probably gonna buy it because I pretty much give Daft Punk all my money, but I've never actually heard anything about it other than it's weird.
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Babar
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« Reply #270 on: Jun 23, 2008, 03:35:02 PM »

Has anyone seen Daft Punk's Electroma? The dvd is coming out soon and I'm probably gonna buy it because I pretty much give Daft Punk all my money, but I've never actually heard anything about it other than it's weird.

it's like a 5 minute long shortfilm stretched out to fill 90 minutes so it's reeeeaaaaalllyyyyy looooooooonnnnnnnggg, and the music isn't even by daft punk.
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G.C.R
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« Reply #271 on: Jun 23, 2008, 08:08:39 PM »

I thought Into Great Silence was really good. And Andrew, the Great Silence is one of my favourite spaghetti westerns, its set in Utah or something, filmed in spain by an italian director, and the hero is a frenchman (jean-louis tratignant) and the villan is a german (klaus kinski,  Heart ). Its pretty cool to see a spaghetti western thats snow bound.

And Wally, I have a massive, massive love for Sayles, I really look up to him as a writer of dialogue especially. The scenes in the bar in Limbo, with all the minor characters talking and the way their conversations flow into each other I thought was inspired. This is partly this thing again of feeling like I should like Limbo, I just have this irritation with it. Same thing with "Sunshine State". I have to see some more of his stuff, I havent done Return of the Secaucus Seven or Lone Star yet, but it s also making me think of the ones I want to see again, like Men With Guns and Roan Innish. earlier this year i re-watched my two favourite Sayles films, "Matewan" and "Brother from another planet" and I think they are both still amazing, some of my favourite films really. Which of his do you like best?
Cineaste magazine did some really good stuff on him recently, with a great interview, and discussions about his working methods with Chris Cooper and David Strathairn. The man usually has about six script drafts on the go at a time, and of course many get discarded, but fuck.   
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Andrew_TSKS
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« Reply #272 on: Jun 23, 2008, 09:10:38 PM »

I thought Into Great Silence was really good. And Andrew, the Great Silence is one of my favourite spaghetti westerns, its set in Utah or something, filmed in spain by an italian director, and the hero is a frenchman (jean-louis tratignant) and the villan is a german (klaus kinski,  Heart ). Its pretty cool to see a spaghetti western thats snow bound.

yes, this is the exact movie i was thinking of. i'd forgotten kinski was in it, but i remembered the thing about the snow. i really need to see that.
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dumbfish
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« Reply #273 on: Jun 23, 2008, 11:22:58 PM »

Votes for Men with Guns and Lone Star as 1 and 1a here. When he's good, Sayles writes such excellent dialogue even I notice it. Limbo held my interest, and I liked the ambiguous ending, but didn't really get into the characters the way I did with 1 and 1a, above.
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auto-da-fey
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« Reply #274 on: Jun 24, 2008, 12:50:40 AM »

Votes for Men with Guns and Lone Star as 1 and 1a here.

I might agree with that. The whole run from City of hope (where's the damn DVD for that???) to Limbo is pretty impeccable, IMO. I was a stupid teenager when The Secret of Roan Inish came out and refused to see a children's/family movie in the theater, and I've regretted that ever since I finally did see it a few years later.
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