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Author Topic: two hours older and more tired- movies thread!  (Read 24582 times)
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nonotyet
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« Reply #450 on: Aug 09, 2011, 01:45:13 PM »

http://videogum.com/349782/dirty-dancing-3d-the-streets/movies/
Quote
July 2: They Arrive
July 3: They Dance
July 4: WE DANCE BACK
Very Happy
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Dick
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« Reply #451 on: Aug 09, 2011, 01:47:46 PM »

I think it has a lot to do with America's cultural inferiority complex, yeah?
It might have to do with the death of the Mid-Atlantic accent.
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Nick Ink
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« Reply #452 on: Aug 09, 2011, 01:48:12 PM »

Oh. Maybe I should've finished it last night, then. She's not real big on Tarantino.

It started out so sweet!

It basically is a Tarantino film. I mean, it's certainly a Tarantino script, but directed by someone else I suppose. At the time, it seemed of a piece with his other early films. Natural Born Killers is the same story. see also Killing Zoe, From Dusk Til Dawn
« Last Edit: Aug 09, 2011, 01:53:55 PM by Nick Ink » Logged

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jm
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« Reply #453 on: Aug 09, 2011, 01:50:39 PM »

I think it has a lot to do with America's cultural inferiority complex, yeah?
It might have to do with the death of the Mid-Atlantic accent.

And there goes Cary Grant, delicately twirling in his grave.
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jebreject
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« Reply #454 on: Aug 10, 2011, 12:58:10 AM »

Is Killing Zoe any good?
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Nick Ink
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« Reply #455 on: Aug 10, 2011, 03:40:49 AM »

Is Killing Zoe any good?

Not in my opinion, no. But I dislike most films, so it might be best to get a wider sample of reviews.

Rotten Tomatoes comes up with 35%
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Greg Nog
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« Reply #456 on: Aug 10, 2011, 08:08:24 AM »

I saw it in high school, when I should have been most primed to like it, but even then, I was pretty underwhelmed by it.  If memory serves correctly, though, you do get to see Julie Delpy's boobs, so.
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G.C.R
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« Reply #457 on: Aug 10, 2011, 10:27:23 PM »

After Arietty and Meek's Cutoff my festival has been mixed - Kid on a bike was ok, as I think I said, should have been better. The new Hong Sang Soo, Oki's Movie, was enjoyable, if very familiar Hong Sang Soo territory (Drinking! Awkward relationships! Cold Weather! non-linear structure!). Winter Vacation was described as "like South Park in slow motion", which I didn't know why I thought would appeal because I'm not a fan of South Park, and it was a fucking dud. One not very funny note, repeated, ad nauseum.
Then the new Bela Tarr, The Turin Horse. This walked a very,very fine line for me - always enough going on, keeping my interest piqued enough to not walk out, but never enough that I stopped being frustrated annoyed with what was a very claustrophobic, very miserable, slow moving beyond belief film. I sort of hated it while I was watching it, but in retrospect it gave me a lot to think on, so I'll probably remember it semi-affectionately.
Then, this morning, a surprise, The Mill and the Cross. I only went to this because I'd seen the director, Lech Majewski, give a talk at the film archive last year. I walked into the theatre, and everyone was white, and I was easily the youngest person there by about 35 years. And I thought, oh no, maybe this was a bad idea. But... wow. The film is about Pieter Brueghels, played by Rutger Hauer, as he paints his 1564 painting, The Procession to Cavalry, but imagined as though he's painting it from life, so Jesus is in 16th century Flanders being persecuted by the Spanish. It doesn't look like any other film I've ever seen. Here: have a look - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qzbbYinuTWc
« Last Edit: Aug 13, 2011, 12:15:30 AM by G.C.R » Logged

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Nick Ink
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« Reply #458 on: Aug 11, 2011, 10:08:07 AM »

That Bruegel film looks great!
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mixed cats
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« Reply #459 on: Aug 11, 2011, 11:00:20 AM »

I haven't watched the link but I would totally watch a film about Brueghel regardless.
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #460 on: Aug 11, 2011, 11:01:25 AM »

Absolutely, looks awesome.
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G.C.R
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« Reply #461 on: Aug 13, 2011, 12:35:36 AM »

After this I saw Once Upon a Time in Anatolia, which the film fest programme had listed in the 'slow cinema' section (I love that they have a slow cinema section) but after The Turin Horse it was like pfft, this isn't slow. I've seen slow. Anatolia was only ok, which, for the festival, is Not Good Enough. The first two thirds I enjoyed, but it meandered after that, and felt like it should have ended much earlier. It also expressed a viewpoint on suicide that I found plain offensive.
Last night I went to Take Shelter, the new film by the guy who did Shotgun Stories, which i loved, and also starring Michael Shannon, who I also love. I was... not prepared for this film. It was fucking brilliant, but it triggered a whole lot of bad feelings for me, I mean, there are scenes where Michael Shannon is mentally just falling to bits and is having such trouble expressing what is happening to the people who care about him that I was sitting in the front row of the theatre crying and shaking. I liked this film a lot. Its ending did, however, suffer from two fucking egregious things that a lot of American films seem to do - firstly, waaaaay too much music, and secondly, it didn't seem to quite know when to end. It felt like it had an ending point to me, and then went on for a couple more scenes. Recommend, though.
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peacocks
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« Reply #462 on: Aug 15, 2011, 11:43:20 AM »

I saw Stardust Memories last night. I liked it a lot. I wanted to talk about it with people after the screening but all anyone could do was make references to a bunch of movies I've never seen before: Wild Strawberries, 8 1/2, and Sullivan's Travels. I know this was Allen's Bergman period and I'm sure he was influenced by Sturges as well because Sturges is awesome, but I wanted to talk about the actual movie we just watched. I was too cowardly to bring this up because I didn't really know anyone at the place and they all knew each other and were happy talking about those other movies and how hilarious this one was in comparison. I'm not a film student so I'm at a disadvantage in these scenarios I guess. I need to watch those three movies!

The movie was pretty funny, but not lol funny like most everyone else thought. Maybe because I haven't seen the other movies I didn't get the jokes. It did make me anxious as hell, because of all the love triangle stuff. I over think and identify with those things too much. He kept talking about how he couldn't fall in love but it seemed his real problem was that he was constantly falling in love. I loved the close ups of his girlfriend Dory when she's in the mental institution (or what seems like one). I could have watched that for a long time. The jolty timeline was great. I liked the murals behind his kitchen table and how they corresponded with his present state of mind. I've read a lot of feminist blog articles about how Allen is supposed to be a super misogynist and awful and I could definitely see that in this movie. The women are supposed to be "real" but they aren't. He shows one side of them, that they are crazy, lost, unattainable, otherworldly. But they were all characters in his masterpiece movie, right? It was never real? Is that a statement he is making? I think it is hilarious that all these gorgeous women are so enthralled with him. That is probably a joke he is making too, constantly. This is only the 6th, almost 7th (I've seen most of Alice) Woody Allen movie I've seen. I want to watch more!
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #463 on: Aug 17, 2011, 12:06:01 AM »

So that new Planet of the Apes movie was pretty okay! Better than pretty okay, in fact. About 1/3 of it is without dialogue, and that 1/3 kicks so much ass. That Andry Serkis guy is the shit. Also in the nonverbal parts you don't have to listen to James Franco's line readings.
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milly balgeary
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« Reply #464 on: Aug 17, 2011, 12:38:57 AM »

So that new Planet of the Apes movie was pretty okay! Better than pretty okay, in fact. About 1/3 of it is without dialogue, and that 1/3 kicks so much ass. That Andry Serkis guy is the shit. Also in the nonverbal parts you don't have to listen to James Franco's line readings.

AGREED.
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G.C.R
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« Reply #465 on: Aug 17, 2011, 12:59:45 AM »

I'm looking forwards to that thing. My dad called me up SUPER EXCITED after he had seen that, saying it was a million miles of fun.
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Babar
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« Reply #466 on: Aug 17, 2011, 02:08:46 AM »

New planet of the apes is pretty x3 good.

Anybody here seen Bernardo Bertolucci's Novecento? A true epic masterpiece in the most literal sense (the film being 320 minutes). It's about the struggle between landowners and peasants in Northern Italy from 1900 to 1945. Every shot lingers on just a little longer for the viewer to catch the detail of every frame, and good golly how beautifully each frame is painted! I think after viewing it once or twice more, this one could become one of my favorites. I'm gonna eat prosciutto and parmesan and drink Italian wine when I watch it the next time.
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Ignatius
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« Reply #467 on: Aug 17, 2011, 02:17:14 AM »

I watched The Rules of the Game tonight. It is sad when you watch old time comedies in a language  you do not speak because all of the timing and multiple-entendres are kinda crushed by subtitles. Like even the title was disposed of subtitle-wise though referenced periodically in the audible French part. Nonetheless, Renoir himself was oozing with ooze, and the Marceau/Schumacher bits were pretty incredible. Slapstick + guns is a comedic formula that I don't think I've seen often enough. In fact, the household staff kinda carried the whole thing for me.

But now I need to learn French and watch it again.
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peacocks
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« Reply #468 on: Aug 17, 2011, 05:25:19 AM »

I saw that movie!!! a while ago. I had to wiki it because the name sounded so familiar and your "guns+slapstick" comment got me thinkin.  I had no idea that it was "one of the greatest films in the history of cinema" but it makes sense. I remember my jaw dropping by the fact that I was basically laughing at people trying to kill each other because it was so silly. The part where everyone is hunting and the girl and old guy are bird watching and they spend forever looking at a squirrel, that part is beautiful. I kind of get what you are saying by the language/time barrier but I still got a lot of laughs and gasps out of it.

Has anyone seen Jules and Jim? It's a Truffaut movie that is playing here on my birthday which is coming up. My friend wants me to see it with him but I think I might rather spend most of the daytime portion of my birthday outside and dramatic love triangles make me all squirmy and introspective.
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Ignatius
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« Reply #469 on: Aug 17, 2011, 11:58:21 AM »

Yeah, I had a great time and I did get plenty of laughs. You know how it is when you think "how entertaining _could_ this be?"
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peacocks
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« Reply #470 on: Aug 17, 2011, 10:44:50 PM »

you just have to watch this scene from the end of Anna Christie.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzgMHP4cu8o
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peacocks
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« Reply #471 on: Aug 22, 2011, 11:45:28 PM »

Saw Manhattan, loved it. Everything about it.
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Babar
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« Reply #472 on: Aug 22, 2011, 11:49:00 PM »

Wonderful film. He really got it right by using Rhapsody in Blue.
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peacocks
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« Reply #473 on: Aug 23, 2011, 07:30:52 AM »

Gawd, the music is really somethin' else.
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Ah_Pook
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« Reply #474 on: Aug 23, 2011, 03:17:52 PM »

i watched Tangled last night. it was surprisingly not awful. i would go as far as to say it was pretty good (minus the music, which was sadly quite bad).
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