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657765 Posts in 9259 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 72 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: Aromatherapy raviolis: the new FOOD thread  (Read 17153 times)
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dumbfish
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Posts: 3869


« Reply #150 on: Aug 23, 2011, 09:56:21 AM »

My gf has chickens, so we've been exploring the eggspace pretty thoroughly. One can eat a nearly infinite quantity of scrambled eggs, but going much over 5 hard-boiled is asking for trouble.
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nonotyet
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« Reply #151 on: Aug 23, 2011, 10:34:26 AM »

Between student loans and saving for this road trip and a million other little things I am finding it increasingly difficult to eat healthily and cheaply. I have a couple starving student vegetarian cookbooks but I keep forgetting they exist and either eating chips and hummus all the time or pasta without sauce, or, more recently, beans and rice. (the other reason for this is that I don't get home until like 6:30 and generally am not in the mood to take things to some elevated culinary level). Last night I was SO EXCITED because I mixed peas and cottage cheese together and ate that and hummus and chips, and I was EXTRA EXCITED because I made the most perfect hardboiled egg I have ever made.

Things are sad in nonotyet gastrointestinal land.  It's not that I'm going hungry. I am bored with my food.
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peacocks
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« Reply #152 on: Aug 23, 2011, 11:05:38 AM »

feelin' you nny. I've been eating yogurt for lunch and some dinners for about a month.
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Greg Nog
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« Reply #153 on: Aug 23, 2011, 09:16:35 PM »

Tonight I am doing as the aphorism says: When life hands you leftover edamame, make edamame burgers!
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G.C.R
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« Reply #154 on: Aug 23, 2011, 09:23:01 PM »

Whaaaat? Please explain these 'edamame burgers'. Because that sounds like something I'd eat a million times.
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Greg Nog
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« Reply #155 on: Aug 23, 2011, 10:27:11 PM »

I had maybe a cup and a half of leftover edamame from the other night, so I threw them in the food processor.  Then I sauteed some shallots in butter and added them, added some black pepper and salt and garlic powder, a tiny bit of miso to kick up the umami, and an egg and some soy-flour to help everything bind together.  I food-processed it all into a sort of paste, formed it into four patties, and fried them in a skillet 'til they were browned on the outside.  They were great!
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G.C.R
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« Reply #156 on: Aug 23, 2011, 10:29:12 PM »

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peacocks
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« Reply #157 on: Aug 23, 2011, 10:37:26 PM »

oh my gaaawd that sounds delicious!  the one time I tried to make burgers out of anything, oatmeal burgers, it was a horrible runny egg mess with dried oatmeal floating in it and then it turned into scrambled eggs with dried oatmeal in it. I ate it. It was not good.

Tonight my friend had me over and I ate leftover empanadias that she made from scratch with valentino hot sauce. My tummy is pleased.
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Bernard
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« Reply #158 on: Aug 23, 2011, 11:13:13 PM »

grated carrot, sauteed in butter with some chopped shallot and minced garlic
couple eggs beaten with a bit of milk & s+p
cook like a frittata
serve with drizzle of soy sauce
salad on the side

Dinner from Bittman's fast food book again. Baby asked for seconds. Tasty, perhaps because of the butter. She never gets butter, I thought a wee bit wouldn't hurt.
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Good Intentions
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Posts: 13882


« Reply #159 on: Aug 25, 2011, 08:19:59 AM »

Between student loans and saving for this road trip and a million other little things I am finding it increasingly difficult to eat healthily and cheaply. I have a couple starving student vegetarian cookbooks but I keep forgetting they exist and either eating chips and hummus all the time or pasta without sauce, or, more recently, beans and rice. (the other reason for this is that I don't get home until like 6:30 and generally am not in the mood to take things to some elevated culinary level). Last night I was SO EXCITED because I mixed peas and cottage cheese together and ate that and hummus and chips, and I was EXTRA EXCITED because I made the most perfect hardboiled egg I have ever made.

Things are sad in nonotyet gastrointestinal land.  It's not that I'm going hungry. I am bored with my food.
I made a pot of pumpkin soup yesterday. It cost me about $3, it's enough for four or so meals, and when I took some in to work today for lunch three people commented on how good it smells and one person asked for the recipe. It's cheap-and-cheerful old-fashioned peasant food. This is the version I made, the way we Afrikaners do it.

1 kg / 2 lbs pumpkin or butternut (you can use sweet potato as well, or even carrots)
2 cooking apples (who am I kidding, I always just use Granny Smith)
2 onions
3 cups stock (traditionally we use chicken stock, vegetable stock is fine)
3 teaspoons curry powder

optional extras:
1 rasher middle/shoulder bacon
1 teaspoon garam masala
1 tin coconut milk

Skin and cube pumpkin, core and dice apple. Roasting the pumpkin for 20-30 minutes before cooking with it takes a little more time (and I almost never get round to it, shame on me) but makes the flavour a great deal richer. Dice the onions, and fry them in a little oil till they become clear (a few minutes). If you're adding bacon, dice it and add it as well. Once the onion is clear, add the curry powder, mix well, and fry till the smell comes through. If you have garam masala, add it in at this point, mix well, but don't let it fry for more than a minute. Add the stock, pumpkin, and apple. Add any extra seasoning you might want - some lemon peel and lemon juice goes well, as does balsamic vinegar or Worcestershire sauce, and a bit of salt unless the stock and bacon accounts for that. Bring to the boil, and let simmer for 15-20 minutes till the pumpkin is soft. Blend it till smooth (or strain it, if you want to be old-fashioned), and bask in your awesomeness/expenditure ratio. This takes half an hour start to finish if you didn't roast the pumpkin beforehand, and of that time only 10 minutes or so is spent in front of the stove.

I've made this in a few variations a couple of times, and my favourite version is also the most old-fasioned one: a bit of bacon and chicken stock for body, and garam masala for richer seasoning, but none of that foreign coconut milk stuff. If you're doing this vegan, then the richness and the body of the coconut milk helps a great deal, and given the amount of servings you get out of this means you can splurge on the expenditure - adding coconut milk just about doubles the cost of the ingredients, but that just shows how cheap everything else is!
« Last Edit: Aug 25, 2011, 08:22:25 AM by Good Intentions » Logged
dumbfish
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Posts: 3869


« Reply #160 on: Aug 25, 2011, 09:23:57 AM »

I was in Austin two weeks ago and can confirm this guy's opinion on brisket.
Franklin BBQ is otherworldly.
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justinh
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Posts: 3083


« Reply #161 on: Aug 26, 2011, 12:20:57 AM »

GI's soup sounds great.  It is squash season down here, and they are surprisingly cheap.  The only bad thing is hauling it back from the market.  I roasted the hell out of a squash (or pumpkin, as they say here) on Friday and it was heroically tasty.  It was great just roasted with a bit of olive oil, scooped out, and mixed with a dash of butter, sour cream, and cayenne. 

In other food bargain news, I bought a massive wad of kale (prolly almost a kilo) for $1.  Now if I can just squeeze a dose of kale into every meal from now on...
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Bernard
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« Reply #162 on: Aug 27, 2011, 03:18:37 PM »

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jm
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« Reply #163 on: Aug 27, 2011, 03:57:44 PM »

Tell me what that is!  It looks amazing.
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Bernard
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« Reply #164 on: Aug 27, 2011, 06:49:00 PM »

That's Wurstkuche! Specialty sausage (exotic stuff, but also veggie ones) and Belgian-style frites. They have a nice beer selection as well.
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Good Intentions
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Posts: 13882


« Reply #165 on: Aug 27, 2011, 08:09:16 PM »

You'll look long and hard to find either Wurstküche or frite which look like that in their natural environment (everything's too chunky by half), or served together, or in those enormous portion sizes (just the fries would be a full meal, standing on a train platform in the Low Countries). That wouldn't stop me eating every morsel of that meal, and sitting back with a dull, mayo-smattered smile of contented gluttony.
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jm
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« Reply #166 on: Aug 27, 2011, 08:56:13 PM »

Yeah, that looks just wonderful!
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mixed cats
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« Reply #167 on: Aug 27, 2011, 09:35:07 PM »

You'll look long and hard to find either Wurstküche or frite which look like that in their natural environment (everything's too chunky by half), or served together, or in those enormous portion sizes (just the fries would be a full meal, standing on a train platform in the Low Countries). That wouldn't stop me eating every morsel of that meal, and sitting back with a dull, mayo-smattered smile of contented gluttony.
America, bro
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over pancakes and orange juices
Greg Nog
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« Reply #168 on: Aug 28, 2011, 12:49:51 AM »

Hella kickass veggie-clam-chowder for dinner!  Kale chips on the side, Bloody Marys to wash it down.
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Bernard
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Posts: 9845


« Reply #169 on: Aug 28, 2011, 02:01:40 AM »

You'll look long and hard to find either Wurstküche or frite which look like that in their natural environment (everything's too chunky by half),

Also the frites had truffle salt on them tonight.  Heart
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Ha, see, and look how Julian Casablancas ended up!!!!
YojimboMonkey
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Posts: 12034


« Reply #170 on: Aug 28, 2011, 02:09:40 AM »

America, bro

There is a suspicious lack of exclamation points and goddamned bald eagles in that post.
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FreddyKnuckles
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« Reply #171 on: Aug 28, 2011, 10:47:03 PM »

America!! Fuck YEAH!!!

If the opposite of GI's post is our country's legacy count me a patriot.
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I'm in with Greg Nog, IT'S FUCKING FAFFLE TIME!
justinh
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Posts: 3083


« Reply #172 on: Aug 29, 2011, 12:51:27 AM »

I have a hard time understanding why beer and sausage emporiums are not saturating the globe. 

There are plenty of places where you can get good beer and german food, but specializing in sausages is perfect--they're fairly cheap, pair well with cheap carbs to soak up alcohol, and are delicious and traditional.  Back in Minneapolis the sausages always seemed to be an afterthought to mountains of spaetzle and pork chops, and I don't even think you can find a decent german restaurant here in Melbourne, let alone one specializing in sausages. 
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Good Intentions
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Posts: 13882


« Reply #173 on: Aug 29, 2011, 01:21:06 AM »

The English heritage of many Australians make it genetically impossible for them to either make or appreciate a good sausage. You'll just have to hope a (non-British) immigrant opens up one.
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justinh
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Posts: 3083


« Reply #174 on: Aug 29, 2011, 07:55:35 PM »

I think you're on to something hear, GI.  Sausages I've had in the UK and here in Australia have been quite boring compared to the sausages of continental Europe. 

What I've found is that there is an unfortunate disconnect between the scene where you find the great food (Asian & Middle Eastern, mostly) and the scene in which you find great beer (hotels, I guess).  I blame Islam, but I also thank it for its culinary cultural exports. 
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