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657809 Posts in 9259 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 78 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: Aromatherapy raviolis: the new FOOD thread  (Read 17230 times)
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milesofsparks
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« Reply #75 on: Aug 05, 2011, 01:45:02 PM »

there was a relatively cheap pizza by the weight place in Rome that is one of the things I miss most.  besides the Umbilicus Urbis.  that beat the pizza slightly--eating that pizza at the Umbilicus Urbis would be pretty close to perfection.
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edison
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« Reply #76 on: Aug 05, 2011, 02:00:24 PM »

Whole Foods actually has a surprisingly good food-by-weight buffet!  Was that the supermarket you were at?

I can't remember at all, it was a few years ago, but possibly. It was in or near Greenwich Village, in the vicinity of NYU.

There's also a fairly good by the weight pizza place in Strasbourg, but it is relatively expensive, which does tend to make the concept a bit less exciting. I want unlimited pizza!
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jm
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« Reply #77 on: Aug 05, 2011, 02:07:39 PM »

There's a good pizza-by-weight place right next to where I work, but the prices are considerably higher than any per-slice place. Which kind of kills the idea.

Is that PIE? I like that place, but yeah, kind of expensive.
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FreddyKnuckles
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« Reply #78 on: Aug 05, 2011, 02:41:04 PM »

I had some bbq by weight from whole foods for lunch today.  $7.99/lb can be pretty costly depending on what you get, but really $4 for a half pound of pretty decent brisket is pretty damn good. 
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Bernard
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« Reply #79 on: Aug 05, 2011, 09:32:31 PM »

Burrata why
Burrata why must you
Burrata why must you be so delicious

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milesofsparks
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« Reply #80 on: Aug 06, 2011, 10:10:38 AM »

bite size frozen banana chunks covered in melted chocolate chips and rolled in chopped peanuts.  YUM.
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Bernard
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« Reply #81 on: Aug 06, 2011, 10:14:39 AM »

Many foods are made more delicious by being bite-sized.

Also, it turns out that it's kale, not swiss chard, where you need to cut out the ribs. That, or I did something else wrong. Those stems were hell of tough.
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jess
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« Reply #82 on: Aug 06, 2011, 12:36:12 PM »

I ate part of a garlic chocolate chip cookie at the farmer's market today. I'm still not sure what I think about it—it was actually pretty good while eating it, but extremely garlicky. I can still taste the garlic intensely almost an hour later. That's a little too garlicky, especially for a baked good, for me. The chocolate/garlic combo wasn't inherently bad though.

Also bought a lot of local peaches and blackberries. Blackberries here are amazing. I'm thinking of going blackberry picking and then trying to make a blackberry shrub with them. Anyone here ever made shrubs before?
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #83 on: Aug 06, 2011, 02:14:03 PM »

Whoa that cookie sounds wild.

We also went to the farmer's market today. For lunch I had a peach, a smoothie made of strawberries, blueberries and banana, a bunch of fingerling potatoes roasted in olive oil, slices of heirloom tomatoes with balsamic, and a big piece of English muffin bread with butter. Easily the best veg meal in recent memory.
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think 'on the road.'
jess
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« Reply #84 on: Aug 06, 2011, 02:27:02 PM »

Nice, that sounds delicious. Eating at the farmer's market is the best. We had fried green tomato BLTs on this very rich, slightly crumbly white bread served with a vegetable pasta salad that made me entirely rethink my typical dismissals of pasta salads (although this would have been as delicious with just the veggies and no pasta). Also had a lavender lemonade. I love the food stand that makes all of that so hard (not the same place that does the cookie).
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clare
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« Reply #85 on: Aug 06, 2011, 06:26:22 PM »

Also, it turns out that it's kale, not swiss chard, where you need to cut out the ribs. That, or I did something else wrong. Those stems were hell of tough.

Yep. That's kale. Anything larger than 5mm needs to go, and then it needs quite a lot of cooking, but it's worth it. Unlike swiss chard, which is a) revolting and b) indigestible. I always say of it that anything where it is a major ingredient may as well be flushed straight down the toilet. Kale is a brassica, swiss chard is a weed.
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jess
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« Reply #86 on: Aug 06, 2011, 06:36:42 PM »

Really? I would expect a lot more people to object to kale than swiss chard. I love swiss chard in soups in particular. I haven't cooked with swiss chard stems, but I know you can, they just require much more cooking than the leaves. Unfortunately they also lose their color when cooked, which is too bad, since it always seems like a waste of rainbow chard to lose the pretty part.
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Good Intentions
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« Reply #87 on: Aug 06, 2011, 08:25:02 PM »

There's nothing wrong with swiss chard! I guess you lot on the West Island are less cultured with that plant than we are here in New Zealand (where silverbeet, as it's called here, is omnipresent). It's lovely if carefully sauteed in garlic butter with some onions, and is a great ingredient for stir fried (where you even use the stalks).
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G.C.R
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« Reply #88 on: Aug 07, 2011, 03:12:55 AM »

Yeah what the hey man I eat silverbeet all the time. Soups, omelettes, pasta sauces, wilted with butter, garlic and lemon juice, as a general all purpose cheaper spinach substitute. It was an important part of my diet growing up, and I'll still happily eat a massive amount. It's also one of the only things, aside from parsley and potatoes, that I've been successful in growing in my garden.
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clare
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« Reply #89 on: Aug 07, 2011, 08:42:24 AM »

Oh yeah, it's omnipresent here too (and yes, it's silverbeet, unless it's rainbow chard) to the extent that any time you get a "cheese and spinach" whatever, it's probably "cheese and silverbeet" I was really pissed off once when I bought something labelled frozen "spinach" that had a pic of silverbeet on the box, and yes, it was silverbeet.

I don't like its flavour, I don't like the weird thing it does to my teeth (astringent/metallic), and I especially don't like the fact that I can't seem to digest it at all. I love tuscan kale (cavello nero) and will eat a large bowl of it steamed/boiled with lemon juice and salt and a bit of olive oil. I also love spinach. I used to grow silverbeet too, but mostly for the chooks (they quite liked it, but they also eat rhubarb leaves, so what would they know, right?). I agree, it's cheap, but not much of a spinach sub. Maybe if you curried the shit out of it...
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jess
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« Reply #90 on: Aug 07, 2011, 11:58:59 AM »

Weird—here you never get that, at least that I'm aware of. That would annoy me too, even though I like chard (which I never knew was called silverbeet).
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milesofsparks
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« Reply #91 on: Aug 09, 2011, 03:36:22 PM »

http://www.good.is/post/3d-candy-printing-an-interview-with-designer-marcelo-coelho/ !!!

also:  http://scandybars.tumblr.com/ 
(between that and http://thecatscan.tumblr.com/, I'm feeling the need to acquire a scanner again.)
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With some of my research and knowledge I am a little sure about it.
jm
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Posts: 4803


« Reply #92 on: Aug 09, 2011, 05:32:52 PM »

NYC people: have any of you heard the term "Chinese cheese" used to refer to some specific kind of cheese?  I'm going to go out on a limb and say the guy that asked about it at the bodega isn't talking about bean curd, but rather is using some sort of regional expression.
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peacocks
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« Reply #93 on: Aug 09, 2011, 08:36:36 PM »

I may be a degenerate and I couldn't even tell you why, but that sounds dirty to me.

oo baby lemme get summa that
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dick-check your priviledge
milesofsparks
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« Reply #94 on: Aug 09, 2011, 10:23:59 PM »

I do not know it.  is it like a Chinese version of paneer?
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FreddyKnuckles
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« Reply #95 on: Aug 09, 2011, 10:43:52 PM »

It's the chinese version of duck butter
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Quote from: Heathcote
I'm in with Greg Nog, IT'S FUCKING FAFFLE TIME!
nonotyet
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« Reply #96 on: Aug 11, 2011, 04:16:21 PM »

We got a box of fruit at work and i took a thing that looked like an underripe orange but it is actually the world's teeniest grapefruit. I did not know they made grapefruit this small! My head is exploding!
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Antero
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« Reply #97 on: Aug 13, 2011, 04:49:09 AM »

My friend made some insane pulled pork.  Hooray for friends!
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this has been OPINIONS IN CAPSLOCK
peacocks
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« Reply #98 on: Aug 16, 2011, 11:27:31 AM »

It says "lightly salted" in small type on the side of the can of this NUT-rition wholesome nut mix but when you open the lid you can clearly see that they dumped as much salt as possible into the container! I mean, I'm still eating them but it's disappointing. It's like buying a box of apples and there being donuts inside when you open it. Oh well, I tried.

Last night I ate a bunch of random shit scavenging in my mom's fridge before rehearsal. Dinner rolls, a cheese sandwich, a butt load of chips and salsa, and 1/4 of a small tupperwear of leftover fried rice and veggies. bleh.
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dick-check your priviledge
Antero
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« Reply #99 on: Aug 17, 2011, 12:52:21 AM »

I would like to give a shoutout to the first Japanese dude who looked at an eel and said, "Yeah, I am going to eat the fuck out of that."  Well done, sir.  Well done.

Also, how the hell did I eat this whole jar of kimchi in two days?
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Quote from: nonotyet
this has been OPINIONS IN CAPSLOCK
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