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657942 Posts in 9260 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 60 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: Aromatherapy raviolis: the new FOOD thread  (Read 17330 times)
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cold before sunrise
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« Reply #425 on: Nov 21, 2011, 08:12:31 PM »

I've got these giant campfire marshmallows that I pull out on bad days and roast over the gas stove, instant happy moment. That said, whoever decided to start incorporating them into dinner foods must have been on some heavy dope.
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Bernard
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« Reply #426 on: Nov 21, 2011, 08:48:04 PM »

I will fuck someone up if they put marshmallows on my sweet potatoes. I hate marshmallows more than I hate anything else in the world. The only things that should be on top of my sweet potato casserole are real butter, brown sugar, pecans and cinnamon.

co-marry me
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G.C.R
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« Reply #427 on: Nov 21, 2011, 08:53:12 PM »

Are you guyses sweet potatoes really sweet, or not that sweet? I tend to think of 'sweet potatoes' as being a savoury food. The idea of putting sugar or marshmallows on one makes about as much sense to me as putting them on an ordinary potato.
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Good Intentions
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« Reply #428 on: Nov 21, 2011, 09:04:06 PM »

Instead of marshmellows, do this with your sweet potato:

Sweet-potato rolls

Rolls:
500g / 2 lbs sweet potato
1 sheet of pastry dough
1/2 cup of raisins (optional)

Sauce:
zest and juice from 1 lemon
1 tablespoon cornstarch
75 ml/5 tablespoons brown sugar, or sugar mixed with a teaspoon of cinnemon
a pinch of salt

Cook the sweet potato (with or without skin, as if your preference) till soft, then mash. Smear over the sheet of pastry, and sprinkle over raisins (if you like, we South Africans put fruit in food at the slightest provocation). Roll the pastry over as you would a Swiss roll. Slice the roll into pieces - if you're using something like filo pastry (which you can), this works better if the mash has cooled down a bit, to help stop the pastry coming apart. Array the slices on an oven tray. Mix the ingredients for the sauce together over medium heat, stirring till the starch has cooked through a little bit and the sauce is at the desired consistency. Pour the sauce over the rolls. Bake in a pre-heated over at 180 C / 350 F for half an hour, till the pastry browns a bit.

Like all proper home-cooking recipes I never measure any of this stuff when I cook, eyeballing all of it, and encourage you to do the same. I've served this both as a side dish, or as dessert with a bit of cream.
« Last Edit: Nov 21, 2011, 09:37:31 PM by Good Intentions » Logged
G.C.R
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« Reply #429 on: Nov 21, 2011, 09:23:43 PM »

I am definitely going to try making that at some point soon.
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justinh
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« Reply #430 on: Nov 22, 2011, 02:38:18 AM »

Eating this smoked salmon and crackers for a snack was a really great idea--it even made this shitty beer more palatable. 

Next up (by wifely request): tuna casserole. 

I never understood the whole marshmallow/sweet potato thing.  I've had it, and it's not terrible--but seems highly unnecessary. 
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cold before sunrise
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« Reply #431 on: Nov 22, 2011, 03:42:33 AM »

oh gosh, hearing what they're made of was like finding out santa wasn't real. marshmallows = horse hooves, pig fat and corn syrup. that sad cat face who didn't like farts inserted here.

found a little heaven at the market, a spanish dream called spicy guasacaca (made with: cilantro, garlic, parsley, peppers, chilli peppers, vinegar and oil). taste bud popping - so fresh - on sauteed white fish or cod coated in breadcrumbs and fried in coconut oil for a heavier, winter rib coater. asian markets sell a 6-variety rice blend that's texturiffic. simmer 1 part rice, one part asian vegetable stock (with scraps, lemongrass, basil, mint, and garlic) and one part coconut milk for about a half hour. the tastes don't fully marry but i like these paired together. with a crisp white that is reminiscent of passionfruit? how does something so simple leave me breathless?

if the cities burn (nukes or riots) and i'm forced to set up a hideaway in the woods the thing i'll miss most is playing with food and flavours. steaming fucking stinging nettle every night, i'd need salt, butter and lemon. did you know that it's the only thing that contains all the nutrients you need for survival? stinging nettle! you've got to wear gloves to collect it and steam the sting out but if you ever get lost in the woods or forced to stay there it's a good thing to know. if you eat too much of it your skin will turn green, like the poison ivy comic book character! great for comic-con. store that, file it away neatly in the memory catalogued banks so it can be found again when/if you need it. memorize this image, in case your life depends on it one day:

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clare
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« Reply #432 on: Nov 22, 2011, 03:43:37 AM »

I don't even get the sugar on sweet potato thing - it's so sweet already, why would you? (though I can get behind sweet potato pie, mysteriously). I also don't generally get the whole sweet dish with your savoury meal thing that USers seem to get into...
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Good Intentions
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« Reply #433 on: Nov 22, 2011, 05:55:38 AM »

In SA we frequently dust sweet potato (and pumpkin, and squash) with cinnamon sugar and serve it as a side dish. The sweetness helps as a break from the heavy, very savoury food that makes up most of the cusine (though our food is frequently more heavily spiced than most US fare).

The Dutch take this to new (or, rather, very old) levels with something called 'hete bliksem' (warm lightning) - apples mashed with potatoes and glazed with syrup, which sometimes gets served as the main starch alongside meatballs or sausages. Throw in some pickles and you have all four tastes on one plate (and umami if the meat is done halfway right) in a homey way you're not likely to see in a fancy restaurant any time soon.
« Last Edit: Nov 22, 2011, 05:58:51 AM by Good Intentions » Logged
cold before sunrise
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« Reply #434 on: Nov 22, 2011, 07:42:02 AM »

oh, those old world europeans. this has been a favourite sunday menu amongst friends, on occasion, for years. also champ: organic pork chops with grainy mustard, raw flower honey, chorizo sausage with fennel seeds and sauerkraut.

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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #435 on: Nov 22, 2011, 01:47:07 PM »

Last three mornings running I've made breakfast with stuff from the farmer's market, so literally everything in these meals came from within ~30mi. of here. Sausage, bacon, french toast, eggs, jam, milk*, kale. One of the eggs I used this morning still had a feather stuck to it!

*okay the milk is actually from Snowville Creamery which is almost 200mi away, but there don't seem to be any good local dairies down over here for some reason. Snowville is like the absolute best milk ever, though.
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peacocks
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« Reply #436 on: Nov 22, 2011, 01:56:51 PM »

That's awesome! I've noticed that local organic produce actually does taste better and it's bigger than the stuff at the regular grocery store.

My reasons for becoming vegetarian were really about eating more sustainably and now that I volunteer and shop at a food co-op that sells local farm raised organic and healthy meat I have been wondering what it would take for me to eat it. This has always been my ideal way to eat. But apparently it would take a lot for me to eat meat again because I don't even think about buying it when I'm there and handling it kind of grosses me out (not enough to mention it to anyone, just in my head I'm like "ew" when I am carrying an armload of frozen naked cornish hens to the freezer). So I guess 7 years has made me a different kind of vegetarian. BUT ANYWAY I still think it is great that these places exist and are getting really popular. I want to live in that kind of world.  Very Happy
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coldforge
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« Reply #437 on: Nov 23, 2011, 03:01:07 PM »

I have resolved to make butter tea this weekend. Reading into central asian cuisine has also made me want to make some Ema Datshi, called by some 'the worst food in the world'.
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jm
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« Reply #438 on: Nov 23, 2011, 03:21:27 PM »

I have resolved to make butter tea this weekend. Reading into central asian cuisine has also made me want to make some Ema Datshi, called by some 'the worst food in the world'.

Whoa, that sounds great.
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clare
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« Reply #439 on: Nov 23, 2011, 05:35:42 PM »

Yeah it doesn't sound nearly as bad as butter tea... I have a friend who went to Bhutan recently. I'm going to ask her about it.
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Chet
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« Reply #440 on: Nov 26, 2011, 10:50:55 AM »

i just made this amazing hot pot.



contents are:

lincolnshire sausage
smoked back bacon
big wedges of onion
leek
chopped garlic
tomato puree
cannellini beans
beef stock

also, the recipe didn't call for it but i added a red chili and a pinch of chili powder for heat.
served with thick slices of crusty bread smothered in butter, it's real hearty food to ward off the english winter.
« Last Edit: Nov 26, 2011, 10:53:48 AM by Chet » Logged

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Greg Nog
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« Reply #441 on: Nov 26, 2011, 01:51:30 PM »

So after butchering the duck for the Thanksgiving turducken, I had various bits of bone and fat and skin leftover. I roasted 'em last night, then cooked them all in water to make a basic broth and render out the fat. And just now, I salvaged as much skin as I could, and made duck gribbenes. Which turns out to be fucking STELLAR.
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coldforge
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« Reply #442 on: Nov 26, 2011, 06:01:01 PM »

YES
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Bernard
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« Reply #443 on: Nov 26, 2011, 08:54:21 PM »

one little scoop of coffee ice cream
one little scoop of chocolate ice cream
 Heart
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Antero
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« Reply #444 on: Nov 27, 2011, 03:47:52 PM »

WE ATE SO MUCH SUSHI LAST NIGHT

ALL THE FISH ARE IN ME
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dumbfish
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« Reply #445 on: Nov 28, 2011, 07:23:42 AM »

I roasted 'em last night, then cooked them all in water to make a basic broth and render out the fat.
We boiled the turkey carcass down last night, though didn't roast first. Was about to strain the skin and bones out of the broth, but now I'm curious about this davygibbenes stuff.
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peacocks
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« Reply #446 on: Nov 28, 2011, 10:15:35 PM »

I ate all the general tso's tofu and I regret it now.
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Ashley
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« Reply #447 on: Nov 29, 2011, 12:05:16 AM »

i'm eating porkchops and garlic mashed potatos and gravy and green bean things.

which isn't THAT exciting, but i think i'm getting a better sense of how to buy groceries and make real meals that you can cook for one person without having to plan everything / buy fresh stuff, because sometimes I can't afford it.

also i would like to marry a tub of greek yogurt. 

my mother was sort of freaked out by yogurt when i was growing up so i never really got to know it, and i thought plain yogurt was definitely going to be awful.    but now i eat it with everything.  cereal, yogurt, fruit, yogurt, oatmeal, yogurt, quinoa, yogurt, butter chicken, yogurt, tacos, yogurt, wrap, yogurt, chicken wings, yogurt, pizza, yogurt.

there is no yogurt with this but i think porkchops and yogurt would definitely be good. ... yogurt and mashed potatos.

as a young woman who is lactose intolerant, i am excited with this yogurt discovery.  maybe now i won't get ostoperoisis.
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Antero
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« Reply #448 on: Nov 29, 2011, 02:40:57 AM »

I love Greek yogurt.  I bought a tub and dumped a bunch of honey into it and mashed it around with a spoon, and magically it turned into breakfast.
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Greg Nog
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« Reply #449 on: Nov 29, 2011, 08:50:33 AM »

Will rep once again for making one's own Greek yogurt, which is hell of fun and results in massive quantities of the stuff!
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