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658302 Posts in 9264 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 53 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: My teacher says I'm breaking books at an eighth grade level: book thread  (Read 40211 times)
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peacocks
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Posts: 4615


« Reply #75 on: Jan 23, 2012, 01:07:18 PM »

I'm sorry Lathe of Heaven lovers, but I am just not loving it yet. I'll keep reading it because I'm not even half way done but it isn't doing a great job of holding my attention.
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dick-check your priviledge
jebreject
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Posts: 27071


« Reply #76 on: Jan 23, 2012, 02:15:49 PM »

Man! That's too bad. It's good. Not my favorite LeGuin, but still really good.
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I'm not racist, I've got lots of black Facebook friends.
elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #77 on: Jan 23, 2012, 03:17:43 PM »

Have you ever read Always Coming Home, Jeb? It's on my reading list.
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think 'on the road.'
elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #78 on: Jan 29, 2012, 12:39:23 PM »

I slaughtered The Public Burning over the last three days in like four marathon sessions. Can already see this will be in my personal canon going forward, right next to Gravity's Rainbow, to which it's like a perfect domestic complement, almost a spiritual sequel in certain aspects. And although Coover isn't the prose stylist that Pynchon is, this is far, far more easy going in terms of the actual work of reading it.
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think 'on the road.'
jebreject
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« Reply #79 on: Jan 29, 2012, 06:04:22 PM »

Have you ever read Always Coming Home, Jeb? It's on my reading list.

No, actually!
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I'm not racist, I've got lots of black Facebook friends.
hannah
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Posts: 9366


« Reply #80 on: Jan 30, 2012, 12:06:42 PM »

I slaughtered The Public Burning over the last three days in like four marathon sessions. Can already see this will be in my personal canon going forward, right next to Gravity's Rainbow, to which it's like a perfect domestic complement, almost a spiritual sequel in certain aspects. And although Coover isn't the prose stylist that Pynchon is, this is far, far more easy going in terms of the actual work of reading it.

I hadn't heard of this book—sounds super, will read it this week! And then I wondered why, given who my father was and what his tastes were, I hadn't heard of it. So I did a search through his files for mentions of Coover, and this was the only thing that came up:

Quote
 And all the people were unspeakably clever.
     We’re all so clever.  I’m clever.  You’re clever.  He’s clever. She’s clever.  Everybody’s clever.  Clever, clever, clever.
     So what are we going to do about it?
     We all read the same books and magazines.  We’ve all read Borges and Beckett and Nabokov and Barth and Coover and Gass and Barton Midwood.
     We’re saturated with cleverness, drowned in cleverness, assaulted by cleverness, gang-banged by cleverness, blown, licked, caressed, kicked, vibrated, mashed, assailed, fondled, buggered by cleverness.
     And all the people were unspeakably clever.
     So what are we going to do about it?
     It may not be a bad thing.  The tone of our age.  Post-anxiety we come upon cleverness.  Maybe it’s all there is.
     He’s only clever.  Merely clever.  Only clever.  Simply clever.
     And all the people were unspeakably clever.
     So what are we going to do about it?
     When does cleverness cease being itself and become sublimed into something more?  Is there something more?  What is it?  How much more?  A foot more, a dollar more, another orbit of electrons?  Smells like depth psychology, if you ask me.
     So what are we going to do about it?
     There ain’t nothing more.  Only cleverness.  That’s all there is.  A jarring metaphor produces no insight, only cleverness.  Forget about the Arrid X-tra Dry, settle for something less.  But not less.  All there is.    
     And all the people were unspeakably clever.
     It’ll have to do until the real thing comes along.  And the real things isn’t coming along.  It’s here.
     So what are we going to do about it?

Which is to say, I am reading The Public Burning starting today.
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coldforge
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« Reply #81 on: Jan 30, 2012, 12:13:42 PM »

I'm glad to see The Coov getting some attention. Universal Baseball Association was a pretty seminal book for me as a kid. I should read this one too.
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è l'era del terzo mondo.
elpollodiablo
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« Reply #82 on: Jan 30, 2012, 12:27:11 PM »

The best part is when Uncle Sam sodomizes Richard Nixon
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think 'on the road.'
coldforge
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Posts: 11924


« Reply #83 on: Feb 01, 2012, 12:16:34 PM »

Have folks here read any Eugenio Montale? I'm only just discovering him and finding him wicked fuckin' simpatico. Nature imagery, deep cosmic pessimism, hermeticism—this is a coldforge's greatest hits.
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è l'era del terzo mondo.
YojimboMonkey
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Posts: 12034


« Reply #84 on: Feb 02, 2012, 10:38:57 AM »

I'm a little annoyed with myself for responding so predictably to an advertisement but I bought a book yesterday called "Death From The Skies! The Science Behind The End Of The World" because I was on the Bad Astronomy site and it was advertised there with a review blurb that said "Reading this book is like getting punched in the face by Carl Sagan."
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Anus-licking causes sepsis; if not given antibiotics within a half hour, they perish.
jebreject
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« Reply #85 on: Feb 02, 2012, 02:19:32 PM »

Have folks here read any Eugenio Montale? I'm only just discovering him and finding him wicked fuckin' simpatico. Nature imagery, deep cosmic pessimism, hermeticism—this is a coldforge's greatest hits.

This sounds great. Will look him up.
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I'm not racist, I've got lots of black Facebook friends.
jebreject
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Posts: 27071


« Reply #86 on: Feb 02, 2012, 02:19:58 PM »

Also I picked up that Coover book. Not sure when I'll get around to reading it, but I look forward to it.
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I'm not racist, I've got lots of black Facebook friends.
coldforge
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Posts: 11924


« Reply #87 on: Feb 02, 2012, 02:32:04 PM »

Have folks here read any Eugenio Montale? I'm only just discovering him and finding him wicked fuckin' simpatico. Nature imagery, deep cosmic pessimism, hermeticism—this is a coldforge's greatest hits.

This sounds great. Will look him up.
Quote from: Eugenio Montale, Ossi di seppia
Often I have encountered the evil of living:
it was the strangled stream which gurgles,
it was the crumpling sound of the dried out
leaf, it was the horse weaty and exhausted.

The good I knew not, other than the miracle
revealed by divine Indifference:
it was the statue in the slumber
of the afternoon, and the cloud, and the high flying falcon.

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è l'era del terzo mondo.
Greg Nog
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Posts: 21629


« Reply #88 on: Feb 02, 2012, 03:06:31 PM »

Is that "sweaty" or is it indeed "weaty"?
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coldforge
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Posts: 11924


« Reply #89 on: Feb 02, 2012, 03:14:20 PM »

Well, it was originally in Italian and since I don't think there's any Italian word that could be translated as 'weaty' I'm gonna go with the former.

Upon investigation: the original line is 'era il cavallo stramazzato', which actually just means 'it was the [collapsed/fallen] horse.' So it could be weaty! Because it's an insertion.
« Last Edit: Feb 02, 2012, 05:52:24 PM by coldforge » Logged

è l'era del terzo mondo.
jebreject
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Posts: 27071


« Reply #90 on: Feb 02, 2012, 05:48:49 PM »

that's some awesome shit.
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I'm not racist, I've got lots of black Facebook friends.
Ignatius
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Posts: 7082


« Reply #91 on: Feb 02, 2012, 09:07:20 PM »

I also like this poem
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davy
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Posts: 24822


« Reply #92 on: Feb 03, 2012, 08:58:58 AM »



Quote
Failed academic Frank Nichols and his wife, Eudora, have arrived in the sleepy Georgia town of Whitbrow, where Frank hopes to write a history of his family's old estate-the Savoyard Plantation -- and the horrors that occurred there. At first, the quaint, rural ways of their new neighbors seem to be everything they wanted. But there is an unspoken dread that the townsfolk have lived with for generations. A presence that demands sacrifice.

It comes from the shadowy woods across the river, where the ruins of Savoyard still stand. Where a longstanding debt of blood has never been forgotten.

Just finished listening to this audiobook on my commute. Really enjoyed it! Probably the best horror novel I've come across since The Terror. It's set in the 1930s in an area of rural Georgia that I used to work in and still pass through regularly, so that was a bonus.
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The drummer IS the foundation, p3wn.
elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #93 on: Feb 03, 2012, 09:02:37 AM »

Nice cover!

I started my second EL Docotorow novel last night, The Book of Daniel. It is intensely unlikable, but still quality reading for all that.
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think 'on the road.'
elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #94 on: Feb 06, 2012, 10:55:21 AM »

Anyone want to rep for a specific translation/edition of Capital? I need copies of the first two volumes since my old omnibus edition got thrown out in the anti-bedbug campaign.
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think 'on the road.'
coldforge
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Posts: 11924


« Reply #95 on: Feb 06, 2012, 11:14:20 AM »

original german, duh

noob
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è l'era del terzo mondo.
elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #96 on: Feb 06, 2012, 11:16:12 AM »

uh i'm studying ENGLISH thanks
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think 'on the road.'
elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #97 on: Feb 06, 2012, 11:23:09 AM »

Also I'm reading this John Williams novel called The Man Who Cried I Am. Impressions after 150 pp are that it's pretty dull, but then again my tolerance at this point in grad school is fairly low for the cosmopolitan travelogue of liberal self-discovery that also serves as backdoor baby boomer fan service. At least this one was published too early to be cynically catering, I guess. I also enjoy the White Devil theme. A lot of the barnstorming racial politics stuff has lost much of its impact since '67 obviously, but the prose is also pretty uninteresting.
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think 'on the road.'
coldforge
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Posts: 11924


« Reply #98 on: Feb 06, 2012, 12:28:07 PM »

Pollo, I bet you'd like this book i've started, Kaputt. It's kind of like a non-postmodern Europe Central.
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è l'era del terzo mondo.
fishjim
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Posts: 1982


« Reply #99 on: Feb 06, 2012, 12:52:46 PM »


I started my second EL Docotorow novel last night, The Book of Daniel. It is intensely unlikable, but still quality reading for all that.

I've only read 2 Doctorows also, and Book of Daniel was my 2nd. My experience was similar to yours - hated all the characters, but I enjoyed it for all that.

I'll rep for the original Book of Daniel, too. Lots of bizarre dreams, beasts with horns, and a strange composite narrator who can't decide if he should refer to himself in the first or third person. Clearly the book is a group effort - like a metal band. Sorta.
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Just wandering the countryside clearing caves.
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