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658130 Posts in 9262 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 44 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: Current reading material?  (Read 229659 times)
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Andrew_TSKS
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Posts: 39426


« Reply #3025 on: Nov 16, 2006, 12:52:55 PM »

holy christ, do we really care anymore who discovers what how? i'll be willing to bet that, if i were of a mind to, i could totally bash both of you for liking certain things for totally wrong reasons. and my only real grounds for bashing you would come down to these two things:

1) i'm older than you, which isn't something anyone can help, and

2) i've got a lot of mental issues with social anxiety, depression, etc, which have led to me focusing on music to the exclusion of almost everything else. therefore, i tend to know about almost everything before almost everybody. which might seem like something to brag about if you TOTALLY IGNORE the reason why it's the case.

not that i'm mad at you guys (by which i mean miles and sarah), y'all are my peeps and i'm merely trying to express peaceful disagreement/willingness to debate the point. i AM, however, mad at gawker, because they are straight up pretentious assholes all the damn time, and it's SUPER-OBVIOUS that the only reason they are bashing marisha pessl is because they REALLY WANT to find a reason to look down on a pretty young girl with a hot new book, since they are super-envious of her fame, fortune, and quite possibly her looks as well (though for all i know gawker's writers are all gorgeous, so i could be wrong on this last point).

besides, i gotta admit, even though i hate some of the music on her ipod, hearing her talk about it made me think she's probably a good writer. i now want to check out her book.
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I just want to be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.
Wally
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Posts: 9184


« Reply #3026 on: Nov 16, 2006, 01:09:01 PM »

Hannah Arendt was also a total fox and her "the life of the mind" is beating the living shit out of me this week, so utterly wonderful even if it is exhausting me and I'm not sure I really understand more then half of what she's saying.

this is a hint, miles and marinus please help me.
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Thus begin the chronicles of the Self-Loathing Gay Commando.
difficult
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Posts: 2175


« Reply #3027 on: Nov 16, 2006, 05:11:11 PM »

Quote from: "elpollodiablo"
Quote from: "alex"

I don't think that's really all that unusual, is it? I do remember that the painter Yves Klein has patented his particular tone of blue.


Man I wish that guy were alive so I could punch him. Not so much for the idea (which is great and subversive) but because he sold a whole bunch of monochromatic paintings. Actually, I think I'd like to punch the buyers.


I can just see the ads:

Buy a Klein and get a free cockpunch from the curmudgeonly chicken at the door! (picyure of bent over rich art-buying couple holding a canvas)
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Your choke chain collars remind me of summer laughter
nonotyet
Registered user

Posts: 7691


« Reply #3028 on: Nov 17, 2006, 08:38:27 PM »



So I says to Biggins, I says, "Blue Like Jazz came in at the library and if it does not help me make it through this weekend I am going to blame you and also the Lord." And Biggins says "Also Donald Miller." And I am like "Oh right, cause he wrote it."

[curtain]
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Good Intentions
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Posts: 13882


« Reply #3029 on: Nov 20, 2006, 12:23:05 AM »

Quote from: "Wally"
Hannah Arendt was also a total fox and her "the life of the mind" is beating the living shit out of me this week, so utterly wonderful even if it is exhausting me and I'm not sure I really understand more then half of what she's saying.

this is a hint, miles and marinus please help me.

I'd love to, but I've never read it.

Feel welcome to send passages along, if you like, and I'll see what I can squeeze out of them. Or talk about her stuff in whatever way.
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Andrew_TSKS
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Posts: 39426


« Reply #3030 on: Nov 20, 2006, 12:25:07 AM »

i really enjoyed peter biskind's "easy riders, raging bulls" when i read it about a year ago, and the same friend of mine who loaned me that loaned me his sequel, "down and dirty pictures", tonight. it's about the boom in american independent movies in the early 90s. i've only read about 10 pages, but i'm already excited.
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I just want to be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.
Good Intentions
Registered user

Posts: 13882


« Reply #3031 on: Nov 20, 2006, 12:26:04 AM »

Quote from: "difficult"
Quote from: "elpollodiablo"
Quote from: "alex"

I don't think that's really all that unusual, is it? I do remember that the painter Yves Klein has patented his particular tone of blue.


Man I wish that guy were alive so I could punch him. Not so much for the idea (which is great and subversive) but because he sold a whole bunch of monochromatic paintings. Actually, I think I'd like to punch the buyers.


I can just see the ads:

Buy a Klein and get a free cockpunch from the curmudgeonly chicken at the door! (picyure of bent over rich art-buying couple holding a canvas)

I really like Malevich ( Black Square and my favourite, White on White). What do I get?
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moloko_plus
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Posts: 1524


« Reply #3032 on: Nov 20, 2006, 03:39:55 AM »

Just finished Rabbit Redux, and I can't decide what I want to read next. I'm having a hard time committing.
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murdered by pirates is good
gibber
Registered user

Posts: 466


« Reply #3033 on: Nov 20, 2006, 09:29:41 AM »

me too, but i've come to a decision.

i have waffled before, but this time i am going to read c.s. forester's horatio hornblower series. it's going to take me well into next year, but i'll do it! i like that adventure-on-the-high-seas stuff too much to let the world's best seafaring saga go unread. i gave patrick o'brien a shot, but he seemed too stodgy and militaristic for me. forester has a bit more mark twain in him--he's more colorful, more propulsive--and the few pages i've read have created a boyish glee deep within my hardened english-grad heart.

first, though, must finish the god delusion, which is great. but i'm getting a little bogged down on nonfiction...
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shhh, it's me.
tops wobbling
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Posts: 510


« Reply #3034 on: Nov 20, 2006, 09:56:03 AM »

I'm on page 300-something of Love in the Time of Cholera, and I just can't seem to put this one away. I'm kind of lukewarm on the book, really, I'm not feverishly reading it late into the night like I was Solitude, but I'm far enough along so I absolutely have to finish. And library fines are steadily mounting...

I can't decide what to read next... I'm thinking Philip Roth, or maybe another Murakami...
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this might be my favorite incident of a can of worms being opened in my entire life.
auto-da-fey
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Posts: 9495


« Reply #3035 on: Nov 20, 2006, 10:29:40 AM »

Halfway through Laura Kipnis' anti-love diatribe, I jumped ship to read Faye Ginsburg's Contested Lives: The Abortion Debate in an American Community, an anthropologist's community study of Fargo, North Dakota in the 1980s. Real high-octane weekend here in my world.
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hannah
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Posts: 9366


« Reply #3036 on: Nov 20, 2006, 12:44:27 PM »

Hey, given that I will be on a plane and then in a toasty, snow-bound house very, very soon, so I will actually have time and, moreover, a desire to read. What should be next on my list?

Essays by Henry James on his travels in Italy?
Rebecca West's 1916 essay on Henry James?
The Varieties of Religious Experience, William James?
Any NYRB edition of otherwise hard-to-find Henry James novellas?

Or, uh ... hey, suggestions gladly accepted. I like feminist film theory and, um, Henry James.
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elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #3037 on: Nov 20, 2006, 12:45:29 PM »

Yikes, girl. I dunno how you stand that shit.
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think 'on the road.'
hannah
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Posts: 9366


« Reply #3038 on: Nov 20, 2006, 12:46:39 PM »

"She might have been a clever frizzled poodle in a frill or a dreadful human monkey in a spangled petticoat."

What's not to love?
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hannah
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Posts: 9366


« Reply #3039 on: Nov 20, 2006, 12:49:41 PM »

And, to (not really) answer your question: I tend to obsess over authors. Last year at this time I absorbed as much Ivy Compton-Burnett as I could get my hands on, which ended up being only four of her novels -- shit's hard to find, and my interest petered out once finals started up. Before that, it was Christina Stead, but she really couldn't keep me obsessed because pretty much everything she wrote after The Man Who Loved Children sucked hard. There was also the Christopher Isherwood phase, and the Rebecca West phase (natch) ... Henry James, however: he's here to stay. For the time being.
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Andrew_TSKS
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Posts: 39426


« Reply #3040 on: Nov 20, 2006, 01:00:15 PM »

hah, these days, whenever people mention henry james, i just think about the character from the comic book "the exterminators".
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I just want to be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.
hannah
Registered user

Posts: 9366


« Reply #3041 on: Nov 20, 2006, 01:16:31 PM »

Andrew, if you haven't read James, you should, m'man. The fellow sure knows how to massage the ostensible sense out of any sentence, and then leave ya hungerin' for more. Commas like whoa and similes like what. Still picking up the scattered pieces of my mind, which was thoroughly destroyed in June: I blame The Wings of the Dove, and maybe just the first sentence thereof:

Quote
She waited, Kate Croy, for her father to come in, but he kept her unconscionably, and there were moments at which she showed herself, in the glass over the mantel, a face positively pale with the irritation that had brought her to the point of going away without sight of him.


Actually, just the first four words:

Quote
She waited, Kate Croy,


I don't know why, but -- it just gets me.
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Lucy
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Posts: 4280


« Reply #3042 on: Nov 20, 2006, 01:20:03 PM »

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auto-da-fey
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Posts: 9495


« Reply #3043 on: Nov 20, 2006, 01:21:48 PM »

Quote from: "Henry James"
She waited, Kate Croy, for her father to come in, but he kept her unconscionably, and there were moments at which she showed herself, in the glass over the mantel, a face positively pale with the irritation that had brought her to the point of going away without sight of him.


You want pale with irritation, how's this: I went to see the 1997 movie version in the theater with my deadbeat friend Lloyd. The guy literally fell asleep minutes in, came to 45 minutes later, grumbled, "has she [Helena Bonham Carter] gotten naked yet? Wake me up when she does," and passed back out. Naturally, I failed to rouse him for the big sex scene, which was fun but not fun enough to override my irritation over his snoring and slobbering.
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hannah
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Posts: 9366


« Reply #3044 on: Nov 20, 2006, 01:30:46 PM »

Quote from: "auto-da-fey"
You want pale with irritation, how's this: I went to see the 1997 movie version in the theater with my deadbeat friend Lloyd. The guy literally fell asleep minutes in, came to 45 minutes later, grumbled, "has she [Helena Bonham Carter] gotten naked yet? Wake me up when she does," and passed back out. Naturally, I failed to rouse him for the big sex scene, which was fun but not fun enough to override my irritation over his snoring and slobbering.


I'm imagining, at intervals, Lloyd Bridges snoring and slobbering, Frank Lloyd Wright snoring and slobbering, and Lloyd Kaufman snoring and slobbering. The last of the three fantasies makes the most sense, I suppose, and, besides, there's something endlessly delightful about the Toxic Avenger's progenitor wanting to see Tim Burton's wife's tits.
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auto-da-fey
Registered user

Posts: 9495


« Reply #3045 on: Nov 20, 2006, 01:49:00 PM »

Quote from: "hannah"
I'm imagining, at intervals, Lloyd Bridges snoring and slobbering, Frank Lloyd Wright snoring and slobbering, and Lloyd Kaufman snoring and slobbering. The last of the three fantasies makes the most sense, I suppose, and, besides, there's something endlessly delightful about the Toxic Avenger's progenitor wanting to see Tim Burton's wife's tits.


Indeed there is, but for a more accurate depiction imagine Lloyd Christmas from Dumb & Dumber (where he picked up the nickname) meets, I dunno, Jim DeRogatis and a benchwarming college linebacker.
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cool banana
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Posts: 1907


« Reply #3046 on: Nov 20, 2006, 07:10:11 PM »

I'm on another David Foster Wallace binge. Just finished A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again for the seventh time and now starting Girl with Curious Hair again.

Also recently read The Great Gatsby and I TRIED so hard to read The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman but I couldn't manage it so I gave it to my friend. ;[
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She's like, so whatever
Wally
Registered user

Posts: 9184


« Reply #3047 on: Nov 20, 2006, 07:17:00 PM »

Quote from: "Good Intentions"
Quote from: "Wally"
Hannah Arendt was also a total fox and her "the life of the mind" is beating the living shit out of me this week, so utterly wonderful even if it is exhausting me and I'm not sure I really understand more then half of what she's saying.

this is a hint, miles and marinus please help me.

I'd love to, but I've never read it.

Feel welcome to send passages along, if you like, and I'll see what I can squeeze out of them. Or talk about her stuff in whatever way.


Yeah, I might end up doing that thanks. I'm well into the second quarter of the book and either I'm getting used to a lot of the terminology and things, or and this what I think is more likely. She's slowed it down with her constant quoting of Hegel and Kant, which I was kinda struggling with, even her analysis of them was a little tricky for me. Now she's taken it on herself to make her points, and well the writing has cleared up a fair bit.

It's unlikely I'll get a chance to type up large chunks over the next week or so but if I do I'll send them over for your analysis. Thanks a lot I do appreciate the offer.
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boganlux
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Posts: 1149


« Reply #3048 on: Nov 20, 2006, 07:34:34 PM »

Isaac Deutscher's biography of Stalin. Speaking of Trotskyists, anyone know of any books or articles dealing with the evolution of many Trotskyists to the right? E.g. is this trend exaggerated (and if so, why)?, are there precedents for it?, explanations--political, sociological or psychological (or socio-psycho-political).
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Good Intentions
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Posts: 13882


« Reply #3049 on: Nov 20, 2006, 08:54:44 PM »

Books? I've read a few articles (for far, far left magazines) and heard a lot of diatribes, but books about Trotskyism are dominated by people like Professor Calicelos, who's a self-glorifying attention-whore. And a Trotskyite. I've lost contact with my online political theory connections, but I've been meaning to change that and I'll see what I can manage.

The best-developed troll I've ever encountered insisted in calling Lev's followers trotsko-fascists, which I always found amusing.
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