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657806 Posts in 9259 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 61 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: Current reading material?  (Read 226755 times)
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Maaik
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Posts: 15119


« Reply #3200 on: Jan 11, 2007, 02:12:44 PM »

Guys, Against The Day is freakin huge!  I'm on the third chapter.
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Sing The Children Over
Registered user

Posts: 1210


« Reply #3201 on: Jan 11, 2007, 07:11:25 PM »

I'm not sure how it happened, but somehow a copy of Chuck Palahniuk's Haunted ended up in our house, and I'd read Fight Club and Invisible Monsters a few years back and hated them as if hatred were my bones, and I'm not sure why but I started reading Haunted on the couch about an hour ago....and I still fucking hate him.
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Tlon
Registered user

Posts: 550


« Reply #3202 on: Jan 11, 2007, 08:04:06 PM »

Declare - Tim Powers

Its sub-John LeCarre spy fiction mixed with urban fantasy and Biblical references. Looks really good, but its too big to carry around in my bag... looking for a good 'bag book' for the bus. Got Moorcock in there now, but might switch to LeCarre or Last Exit to Brooklyn
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davy
Registered user

Posts: 24822


« Reply #3203 on: Jan 11, 2007, 09:21:44 PM »

Quote from: "Sing The Children Over"
I'm not sure how it happened, but somehow a copy of Chuck Palahniuk's Haunted ended up in our house, and I'd read Fight Club and Invisible Monsters a few years back and hated them as if hatred were my bones, and I'm not sure why but I started reading Haunted on the couch about an hour ago....and I still fucking hate him.


yeah, i find him to be a pretty repulsive writer.
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davy
Registered user

Posts: 24822


« Reply #3204 on: Jan 11, 2007, 09:26:19 PM »

i am wholly excited to be starting this:



i was totally going to try ilium and olympos first, but shit dudes, a brand new 800-page book about the 1845 polar expedition to find the northwest passage getting frozen in the pack-ice and subsequently decimated by an arctic monster...

i gotta get on that, and fast.
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The drummer IS the foundation, p3wn.
silentsigh89
Registered user

Posts: 3073


« Reply #3205 on: Jan 11, 2007, 09:43:49 PM »

I am now about 200 pages into Women in Love, which Lucy gave to me for my birthday!!

I'm really enjoying it so far, but mostly I think I want rupert and gerald to fall in love. FORGET WOMEN, BOYS! You don't need 'em.
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YojimboMonkey
Registered user

Posts: 12034


« Reply #3206 on: Jan 11, 2007, 09:49:22 PM »

Oh shit Davy I didn't even know Simmons had a new one coming out.  He's probably my current favorite author.  I got Olympos for Christmas and haven't gotten around to reading it yet 'cause it's been so long since I read Ilium that I was thinking about rereading it first.

That new one sounds fucking intense.
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martin_van_buren
Registered user

Posts: 2062


« Reply #3207 on: Jan 11, 2007, 09:50:17 PM »

Oh man, The Terror looks awesome. And sounds awesome too.
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plainenglish
Registered user

Posts: 1187


« Reply #3208 on: Jan 11, 2007, 09:53:55 PM »

Quote from: "fygmynt"
Quote from: "Sing The Children Over"
I'm not sure how it happened, but somehow a copy of Chuck Palahniuk's Haunted ended up in our house, and I'd read Fight Club and Invisible Monsters a few years back and hated them as if hatred were my bones, and I'm not sure why but I started reading Haunted on the couch about an hour ago....and I still fucking hate him.


yeah, i find him to be a pretty repulsive writer.


This is really interesting, because I really loved the movie (Fight Club) (or do I just love Ed Norton?)  

Whence the hatred?
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plainenglish
Registered user

Posts: 1187


« Reply #3209 on: Jan 11, 2007, 10:10:23 PM »

Quote from: "andronicus"
Quote from: "rockmeamadeus"
Quote from: "andronicus"
I finished reading Moby-Dick last night.

Hurray!


Dog your written piece on Moby Dick brings up a lot of intersting ideas. F'real, shit I hadn't thought about.

Also it was refreshing to see an interpretation free from Freudian sex-jive.
Thanks bro, I appreciate it muchly.


Hey -- v. much in love with Melville, and by extenstion of course Hawthorne, and by extension of course the rising, gripping, slowly overpowering feeling that there is something, something quite terrible, yes, quite abominable and frightening hovering just beond our understanding if only you would name it, man, give it a NAME!

Sorry.

In any case, I'm reading your writeup on the Dick with great interest, esp the last paragraph, but there's one sentence I don't quite understand -- I don't mean to be a pain, I just can't fit it in and I'm very interested in this because I think the change in interpretation says something very interesting about... well, anyway, this sentence:
"But to the modern reader, ought not the whale's gaze be our fear, but rather what gazes back?  "

Quoi?
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"If you don't want to have a good time, the door is... everywhere!" -- shirtless campfire guy, ZOOP!
heather marie
Registered user

Posts: 5753


« Reply #3210 on: Jan 11, 2007, 10:11:58 PM »

Picked up Margaret Atwood's Moral Disorder and Joan Didion's We Tell Ourselves Stories In Order To Live today at the library. Reading the Atwood now and I think I love it but I'm not sure yet.
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hannah
Registered user

Posts: 9366


« Reply #3211 on: Jan 11, 2007, 11:01:16 PM »

Quote from: "silentsigh89"
I am now about 200 pages into Women in Love, which Lucy gave to me for my birthday!!

I'm really enjoying it so far, but mostly I think I want rupert and gerald to fall in love. FORGET WOMEN, BOYS! You don't need 'em.


READ THE RAINBOW NEXT!!!! no boy-on-boy action, but a little ursula-winifred lovin'
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silentsigh89
Registered user

Posts: 3073


« Reply #3212 on: Jan 11, 2007, 11:12:19 PM »

Quote from: "hannah"
Quote from: "silentsigh89"
I am now about 200 pages into Women in Love, which Lucy gave to me for my birthday!!

I'm really enjoying it so far, but mostly I think I want rupert and gerald to fall in love. FORGET WOMEN, BOYS! You don't need 'em.


READ THE RAINBOW NEXT!!!! no boy-on-boy action, but a little ursula-winifred lovin'



oooh, really? Well, then! It's been added to the list! With two special stars next to it; one that stands for "Hannah is" and one that means "Awesome"
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hannah
Registered user

Posts: 9366


« Reply #3213 on: Jan 11, 2007, 11:14:17 PM »

Niiiice! Seriously, though, The Rainbow is my favorite Lawrence, although Women in Love is a close second.
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davy
Registered user

Posts: 24822


« Reply #3214 on: Jan 11, 2007, 11:57:52 PM »

Quote from: "YojimboMonkey"
Oh shit Davy I didn't even know Simmons had a new one coming out.  He's probably my current favorite author.  I got Olympos for Christmas and haven't gotten around to reading it yet 'cause it's been so long since I read Ilium that I was thinking about rereading it first.

That new one sounds fucking intense.


you didn't miss it by much...the terror came out this tuesday, on the 9th. i work at borders, and it was in a company email i just got.

i just sat down with it for the first time and busted out 70 pages with ease. this is gonna be awesome. for somebody like me, who already gets giddy about adventures at sea--and doubly giddy about polar exploration--all dan simmons has to do is keep the typewriter running.

i've picked up hints here and there that dan simmons was going to be a major discovery for me...i've been looking for epic, literate sci-fi for awhile now, and have had ilium on my list for awhile. but then i got that email tonight and went straight to work to check out a copy.

psyched!
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davy
Registered user

Posts: 24822


« Reply #3215 on: Jan 12, 2007, 12:02:09 AM »

it's also EASILY the most black metal thing i've ever read.

i recommend spinning at the heart of winter by immortal as you turn that first page.
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The drummer IS the foundation, p3wn.
andronicus
Registered user

Posts: 6515


« Reply #3216 on: Jan 12, 2007, 12:05:23 AM »

Quote from: "plainenglish"
In any case, I'm reading your writeup on the Dick with great interest, esp the last paragraph, but there's one sentence I don't quite understand -- I don't mean to be a pain, I just can't fit it in and I'm very interested in this because I think the change in interpretation says something very interesting about... well, anyway, this sentence:
"But to the modern reader, ought not the whale's gaze be our fear, but rather what gazes back?  "

Quoi?
What gazes back is Ahab, and more, the transition that Ahab represents, from whaling as heroic pursuit of noble prey (Homeric, yeah?) into a scene of seas black with a swarm of boats that are dispassionate engines of death, not just for the whales but for those men caught in them.  Melville laments this transition, and Ahab is both the ultimate expression of the old way (baddest dude chasing the biggest whale) and a harbinger of things to come (in the blog talking about Ahab's American impulse not to just slay Moby-Dick but to remake him, nullify him).  The tragedy of Moby-Dick isn't that Ahab fails to get his whale, but that after he does so, Moby-Dick ceases to even have a name.  I think it's significant that Melville's original title for the book was Moby Dick; or, The Whale.  It's like the death of Romanticism, I guess.  The utter annihilation of the Other.  

What you say about the unnameable terror, yes, absolutely; I think Melville also sees a terror just as unnameable within ourselves.  Or, better, between ourselves.

edit: I may have just basically repeated myself.  Sorry if that didn't help any.
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plainenglish
Registered user

Posts: 1187


« Reply #3217 on: Jan 12, 2007, 01:31:30 AM »

Quote from: "andronicus"
Quote from: "plainenglish"
In any case, I'm reading your writeup on the Dick with great interest, esp the last paragraph, but there's one sentence I don't quite understand -- I don't mean to be a pain, I just can't fit it in and I'm very interested in this because I think the change in interpretation says something very interesting about... well, anyway, this sentence:
"But to the modern reader, ought not the whale's gaze be our fear, but rather what gazes back?  "

Quoi?
What gazes back is Ahab, and more, the transition that Ahab represents, from whaling as heroic pursuit of noble prey (Homeric, yeah?) into a scene of seas black with a swarm of boats that are dispassionate engines of death, not just for the whales but for those men caught in them.  Melville laments this transition, and Ahab is both the ultimate expression of the old way (baddest dude chasing the biggest whale) and a harbinger of things to come (in the blog talking about Ahab's American impulse not to just slay Moby-Dick but to remake him, nullify him).  The tragedy of Moby-Dick isn't that Ahab fails to get his whale, but that after he does so, Moby-Dick ceases to even have a name.  I think it's significant that Melville's original title for the book was Moby Dick; or, The Whale.  It's like the death of Romanticism, I guess.  The utter annihilation of the Other.  

What you say about the unnameable terror, yes, absolutely; I think Melville also sees a terror just as unnameable within ourselves.  Or, better, between ourselves.

edit: I may have just basically repeated myself.  Sorry if that didn't help any.


No, it did help -- I think it was the wording that turned me around, the "ought not".  But I understand what you're saying -- at the time, the terrifying monster was clearly the whale, but after (and also through) Melville's depiction of the change in whaling, we're able to see that the more terrifying monster is Ahab (or, more to the point, the skillions of other Ahabs who will come after, with better, faster boats, etc...)  Of course now we're more than prepared to see human beings as the bad guys, but the "noble creature of God" idea was so prevalent then, it was quite a switch.  I'm trying to remember the name of the Hawthorne story along the same lines, the parson who starts wearing a black veil: what horrible sin has he committed?  No one ever knows.  Brrrrr!!

Of course now I'm inspired to read Moby Dick, but it won't happen, not for many years, I'm sure.  I'll have to content mself with re-reading Billy Budd, which was pretty excellent as well.
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tops wobbling
Registered user

Posts: 510


« Reply #3218 on: Jan 12, 2007, 11:13:12 AM »

I've been reading Party Out of Bounds: The B-52s, R.E.M. and the Kids who Rocked Athens, Georgia by Rodger Lyle Brown. I've got to say it's been a pretty good read.

Really, the early chapters were more up my alley, so funny to read about a dress-in-drag Fred Schneider teaming up with the beehive girls from the B-52s to crash frat parties in rural GA. Slightly surreal, and well it's still pretty strange how Athens is simultaneously so redneck and so ... weird.

Correspondingly, I've been listening and re-listening to the music lately. God, I used to hate the B-52s so much. "Love Shack" was just so ubiquitous and so ... annoying. Jeez. But their early stuff is so weird and so funny, and the guitarist certainly has some pretty nifty surf-guitar riffs in his bag of tricks.

Pylon, who I'd never listened to before, is unreservedly awesome. Mechanical and danceable, like Krautrock, but more fun. Now, I wish I had seen them when they reunited for Athfest. Drats.

R.E.M. well I never stopped with their first few albums, I still listen to Murmur (I think that's my favorite, so dark & mysterious) and Chronic Town (esp "Wolves, Lower") quite a bit, but it's been great to hear them on vinyl, thanks to Spencer's copious collection of athens-related records. The later albums, however, have not aged well. Document, in particular, was pretty hard to listen to. And I used to love that album. There are still good songs, but now it just sounds so overproduced and obvious (when compared to the earlier obscurity).

Hmmm, that's it.Reading about rock music is a nice departure from all the literary stuff I usually read, and this book has been esp great since I recognize all the streets and some of the houses they talk about. Maybe next I'll become a Canuck and read Neil Young's biography.
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Greg Nog
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Posts: 21629


« Reply #3219 on: Jan 12, 2007, 11:18:13 AM »

Okay, I've never read anything by Simmons, but the Terror sounds fricking AWESOME.  Perhaps I'll read that next.  fygmynt, would you recommend that over his other books?

Quote from: "silentsigh89"
I am now about 200 pages into Women in Love, which Lucy gave to me for my birthday!!

I'm really enjoying it so far, but mostly I think I want rupert and gerald to fall in love. FORGET WOMEN, BOYS! You don't need 'em.


YESSSSSSSS.  I love that book.  Did you get to the wrestling scene yet?  M4M, TOTALLY STR8 DUDE HERE 4 NAKED GRAPPLING, IM ME
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rockmeamadeus
Registered user

Posts: 7199


« Reply #3220 on: Jan 12, 2007, 02:30:20 PM »

Whoa I missed that:

ANDREW. YOU GOTTA WRITE THAT THING, MAN. YOU NEED TO. I WILL BUY 18 COPIES. FUCKING SLINT, MAN.
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YojimboMonkey
Registered user

Posts: 12034


« Reply #3221 on: Jan 12, 2007, 02:47:58 PM »

Quote from: "Greg Nog"
Okay, I've never read anything by Simmons, but the Terror sounds fricking AWESOME.  Perhaps I'll read that next.  fygmynt, would you recommend that over his other books?


You didn't ask me but I will tell you that all the books I've read by him are fantastic.  He writes some of the most inventive and engaging science fiction you'll ever read.  He writes hard-boiled crime fiction.  He writes horror novels.  He's talented, versatile, highly literate and consistenly fun to read.

Here is an interview with Dan Simmons  I especially like this part:

Quote from: "Dan Simmons"
Anyone who spends his or her life reading inside just one genre is an idiot.


So it's only appropriate that he doesn't limit himself to one genre of writing.
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silentsigh89
Registered user

Posts: 3073


« Reply #3222 on: Jan 12, 2007, 04:06:11 PM »

Quote from: "Greg Nog"
Okay, I've never read anything by Simmons, but the Terror sounds fricking AWESOME.  Perhaps I'll read that next.  fygmynt, would you recommend that over his other books?

Quote from: "silentsigh89"
I am now about 200 pages into Women in Love, which Lucy gave to me for my birthday!!

I'm really enjoying it so far, but mostly I think I want rupert and gerald to fall in love. FORGET WOMEN, BOYS! You don't need 'em.


YESSSSSSSS.  I love that book.  Did you get to the wrestling scene yet?  M4M, TOTALLY STR8 DUDE HERE 4 NAKED GRAPPLING, IM ME


I, erm. Got to it today in english class! I was reading after a test. I felt like the creepy man looking at porn in a library!!
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Andrew_TSKS
Registered user

Posts: 39426


« Reply #3223 on: Jan 12, 2007, 04:11:21 PM »

Quote from: "rockmeamadeus"
Whoa I missed that:

ANDREW. YOU GOTTA WRITE THAT THING, MAN. YOU NEED TO. I WILL BUY 18 COPIES. FUCKING SLINT, MAN.


if i could come up with anything to say about it, i would. i guess maybe i should think about this idea more. i have tons of stuff to say about antioch arrow, but i'm almost certain that idea will get rejected. the album isn't even in print anymore. i'm thinking maybe i will write the proposal for the antioch arrow album, but not submit it right away, and then see if something comes up in my mind for the slint album. and if i come up with a proposal for it, i'll send that instead. either way, though, writing up all of the stuff i'm thinking about a. arrow is good preparation for the book i want to someday write about the chaotic hardcore movement of the early 90s, so i should probably go ahead and figure out the proposal anyway, even if i don't submit it.

by the way, i just started "someone comes to town, someone leaves town" by cory doctorow. it's really interesting so far, but i'm still only about 10 pages in, so i'm not too sure how it will develop.

and i've been drooling over "the terror" a bit myself since it came into my store. may have to pick up a copy.

Quote from: "tops wobbling"
Correspondingly, I've been listening and re-listening to the music lately. God, I used to hate the B-52s so much. "Love Shack" was just so ubiquitous and so ... annoying. Jeez. But their early stuff is so weird and so funny, and the guitarist certainly has some pretty nifty surf-guitar riffs in his bag of tricks.


i think the thing that really killed the b-52s was their original guitarist dying of aids in the mid-80s. the record with "love shack" was either the first or second one they did without him, and that really made a big difference in their sound. for the commercial and for the worse, if you ask me.

sorry if that constitutes a spoiler to your book, but i'm assuming you already know that that happened--it's pretty common knowledge.
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davy
Registered user

Posts: 24822


« Reply #3224 on: Jan 14, 2007, 10:07:03 AM »

Quote from: "plainenglish"
Quote from: "fygmynt"
Quote from: "Sing The Children Over"
I'm not sure how it happened, but somehow a copy of Chuck Palahniuk's Haunted ended up in our house, and I'd read Fight Club and Invisible Monsters a few years back and hated them as if hatred were my bones, and I'm not sure why but I started reading Haunted on the couch about an hour ago....and I still fucking hate him.


yeah, i find him to be a pretty repulsive writer.


This is really interesting, because I really loved the movie (Fight Club) (or do I just love Ed Norton?)  

Whence the hatred?


i loved the movie, too. palahniuk, i think, just happens to be one of those writers whose work can only be improved through screen adaptation. because he's visceral and visual and vulgar, and a terrible writer who gets carried away too easily. due to ratings and the short running times, films have to cut out a lot of that nonsense.
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