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657783 Posts in 9259 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 61 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: R e C I P E S  (Read 48922 times)
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das kranke Tier
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Posts: 5894


« Reply #325 on: Jan 18, 2007, 01:19:44 PM »

Quote from: "nonotyet"
Spanakopita: filo dough + spinach + feta cheese=pie lookin' thing.

I mean, I knew that and I'm not even Greek.


Oh, so sue me, I got confused.

What the hell's that cheese dish called then (and do not tell me that Google is my friend, as I fear what will come up if I enter "flaming cheese")?
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Compendious as hell
nonotyet
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Posts: 7691


« Reply #326 on: Jan 18, 2007, 01:21:40 PM »

Saganaki.

PS. You a wuss.
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das kranke Tier
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Posts: 5894


« Reply #327 on: Jan 18, 2007, 01:24:44 PM »

WORD

That stuff's awesome!
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Compendious as hell
swilkes
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Posts: 1032


« Reply #328 on: Jan 19, 2007, 08:26:50 PM »

Quote from: "Nick Ink"
Dwenjang chigae

water in a saucepan
2 tablespoons soy bean paste
1 tablespoon red pepper paste
chopped onions
big lumps of potato, carrot, sweet potato
a few mushrooms maybe, a bit of courgette, praps a leek

boil it all for a while

dice up a bit of some tofu and bung in at last minute

serve with dry, salted seaweed and sticky rice

It's good, wintery, spicy, warm-tummy food


Sounds good. I've been obsessing over Korean food lately. Do you or anyone else in Korea (morgan, right?) know how to prepare jobchae (alt spelling I've seen: chap chae) noodles? I've had them at restaurants, but I'm afraid to cook them at home for fear of overcooking & creating a sticky mess. I've had poor luck with rice noodles in my kitchen, so I'm wary of trying out yam noodles.
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ellaguru
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Posts: 5447


« Reply #329 on: Jan 20, 2007, 08:33:14 PM »

Not a recipe per se, but, y'know, food-related.

I bought myself a juicer for Christmas, and it's awesome.

Today I had me some apple-raspberry-grape juice with just a hint of lemon.

Fresh juice rules.
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I also engaged in a rigorous study of philosophy and religion...but cheerfulness kept creeping in.
plainenglish
Registered user

Posts: 1187


« Reply #330 on: Jan 20, 2007, 10:05:39 PM »

Some comfort food for cold weather...

Black Bean Soup

- 2 cups dry black beans
- 4 Tablespoons butter
- 3 cloves garlic, minced
- 1 onion, chopped
- 2 celery stalks, chopped
- 2 quarts water
- 1/2 cup rice
- juice of 1 lemon
- salt and pepper to taste

1. Soak the beans overnight in plenty of water. Rinse well in cold water and drain.

2. Place 3 Tablespoons of the butter in a soup pot and saute the garlic until golden brown.  Add the onion and saute for a few minutes.  Add the beans, celery and water.  Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low-medium.  Cover the pot and cook slowly for 1 1/2 hours, stirring occasionally.

3. When the beans are tender, add the rice, lemon juice, salt, pepper, and more water if necessary.  Cover the pot and cook slowly for another half hour.

4. Melt the remaining butter in a separate skillet, add the flour, and mix thoroughly (until there are no lumps).  Add this mixture to the soup and blend well.  Serve hot with rolls and butter.

NOTES:
-Do not be scared off by the dry beans! Dry beans are cheaper, healthier, and a million times better tasting than canned.  All you have to do is soak them overnight.  If you are worried about, er, gastric repercussions, rinse and drain the beans a few extra times during the soaking.
-Salt stops beans from cooking! (Who knew?) So make sure the beans are tender before adding the salt.
-Brown rice will require more water and longer cooking time than white rice. Sayin'.



Easy, Yummy Dinner Rolls
(and lots of other bready things: this recipe can be used to make pizza dough, calzones, add a cup of sugar and some cinnamon for cinnamon rolls, whatever you can dream up.)

- 1 cup water
- 1 cup milk
- 1 cup oil (for pizza, olive oil; for sweet rolls, canola oil; etc.)
- 2 Tbsp yeast
- 1 tbsp salt
- 5 cups flour

Put water, milk, and oil into a microwaveable bowl.  Heat on high for 1 minute, until warm but not hot. (You should be able to keep your finger in the liquid without scalding.)

In a large mixing bowl, thoroughly mix the yeast, salt, and flour.  

Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix well.  If you have a standing mixer ith a dough hook, this is optimal; if not, mix by hand until the dough forms into a ball.  Add flour 1/8 cup at a time if needed.  

Leave the dough in the miing bowl, cover with a towel, and put the bowl someplace warm (but not hot, not inside the oven) for one hour.

After the dough has risen for one hour, punch the dough down (knead a bit, but do not overwork.)  Generously oil the bottom and sides of a shallow baking pan; place the dough in the pan and pat some oil over the surface of the dough.  Form the dough into three loaves, one large braid, or multiple rolls as desired.  Cover the baking pan with the towel and let the dough rise again for 30 minutes.  

After the dough has risen for the second time, bake at 350.  One large loaf should take about 30 minutes to cook, individual rolls will take less time.  The bread is done when the top is golden brown and the bread sounds hollow when you knock on the top.  

(This is also delicious the next morning with butter and cinnamon sugar!)
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milesofsparks
Registered user

Posts: 5200


« Reply #331 on: Jan 30, 2007, 11:33:11 PM »

re:  black beans--i also love black beans with mango sauce, a molly katzen recipe.  i can post if anyone's interested.

i've been getting back into baking bread lately.  i have a bread machine, and i'm not usually into the kitchen gadgetry, but it makes me happy.  i don't have an at-home enough schedule to do bread properly otherwise.  i also got a baguette pan recently, to attempt to do the baking step in the oven so the loaves wouldn't be square with a weird hole in the bottom, but long and crispy.  the first batch didn't turn out exactly like i wanted, more chewy than crispy.  i did the ice-cubes in the oven trick...  any other suggestions?  any other bread bakers out there?  hello?


[edited for spelling.  damn, i can't spell when i'm tipsy]
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Ah_Pook
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Posts: 6082


« Reply #332 on: Jan 30, 2007, 11:55:15 PM »

i made some pretty damn great apple chicken stir fry stuff with cinnamon and herbs and veggies. ive never cooked with cinnamon before, it came out really well. definitely going to add it to the ingredient list more ofte.
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milesofsparks
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Posts: 5200


« Reply #333 on: Feb 07, 2007, 11:17:18 PM »

I started actual cooking again, as opposed to eating peanut butter out of a jar and calling it dinner (also as a result of 2, count 'em, 2 cases of food poisoning in a week from eating out with friends).  Cooking makes me happy--I'm going to keep it up no matter how crazy school gets.  I made pasta sauce out of mushrooms and some left over red wine and canned tomatoes and spices.  Delicious!  Adding wine dependably magnifies deliciousness.
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Good Intentions
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Posts: 13882


« Reply #334 on: Feb 08, 2007, 12:43:11 AM »

Transplanted from the "if you are reading the boards" thread:

Quote from: "theartlessmonster"


Persian Love Cake...

Quote from: "theartlessmonster"

Candied rose petals
2 large egg whites
1/2 cup sugar
Petals from 2 organic roses

Cake
1 cup cake flour
14 tablespoons baker's sugar or superfine sugar, divided
1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon coarse kosher salt
3 large eggs, separated
6 tablespoons water
1/4 cup canola oil
1 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1/4 teaspoon whole cardamom seeds (removed from about 5 green cardamom pods)

Frosting
2 1/2 cups chilled heavy whipping cream, divided
Pinch of saffron threads

2/3 cup powdered sugar
1 teaspoon rose water

2 tablespoons natural unsalted pistachios

For candied rose petals:
Whisk egg whites in small bowl until foamy. Using pastry brush, brush rose petals on both sides with egg whites; sprinkle on both sides with sugar. Dry on nonstick rack at least 6 hours or overnight.

For cake:
Preheat oven to 325°F. Butter two 8-inch-diameter cake pans with 1 1/2-inch-high sides. Line pan bottoms with parchment paper; butter parchment. Sift flour, 7 tablespoons baker's sugar, baking powder, and salt into large bowl. Whisk yolks and next 4 ingredients in small bowl until smooth. Add yolk mixture to dry ingredients; whisk until smooth. Beat egg whites in medium bowl until soft peaks form. Gradually add 7 tablespoons baker's sugar; beat until whites resemble thick marshmallow fluff. Fold whites into batter in 3 additions. Divide batter between prepared pans. Bake until cakes are golden and tester inserted into center comes out clean, about 25 minutes. Cool in pans on racks 15 minutes. Turn out onto racks, peel off parchment, and cool completely. (Can be prepared 1 day ahead. Wrap and store at room temperature.)

For frosting:
Combine 1/2 cup cream and saffron in small saucepan. Bring to simmer. Remove from heat; let steep 20 minutes. Chill until cold.

Beat remaining 2 cups cream, powdered sugar, and rose water in large bowl until soft peaks form; strain in saffron cream. Beat until peaks form.

Place 1 cake layer, flat side up, on platter. Spread 1 cup frosting over. Top with second cake layer, flat side down. Spread remaining frosting over top and sides of cake. Chill at least 1 hour and up to 6 hours. Garnish cake with rose petals and pistachios.

Makes 8 servings.

so i'm not sure it's feasible if i can't find the petals tommorrow because they need to sit overnight, i need to make it for friday.  unless i substitute something else to decorate the top.
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milesofsparks
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Posts: 5200


« Reply #335 on: Feb 08, 2007, 12:49:12 AM »

i love cardamom and saffron.  i might actually make this...
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SPACERACE
Registered user

Posts: 12155


« Reply #336 on: Feb 08, 2007, 12:54:19 AM »

ok, challenge: i need to figure out some way to integrate caramel into chocolate truffles. i don't have one of those food syringes, that would be too easy. the only other thing i can think of is shaping the truffles around some dulche de leche, but i can see that going haywire. eh?
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milesofsparks
Registered user

Posts: 5200


« Reply #337 on: Feb 08, 2007, 01:21:21 AM »

Quote from: "reeseboisse"
ok, challenge: i need to figure out some way to integrate caramel into chocolate truffles. i don't have one of those food syringes, that would be too easy. the only other thing i can think of is shaping the truffles around some dulche de leche, but i can see that going haywire. eh?


into pre-made truffles?  sounds tricky.  maybe a small pastry tube?  or turkey baster?  or cobbled together version of same?
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Bernard
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Posts: 9845


« Reply #338 on: Feb 08, 2007, 02:32:20 AM »

I am certifiably Iranian and I have never seen that type of cake before. I bet it smells great, though it sounds like a lot of ingredients used in Iranian food all just shoved together haphazardly into a cake.
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Ha, see, and look how Julian Casablancas ended up!!!!
milesofsparks
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Posts: 5200


« Reply #339 on: Feb 08, 2007, 02:35:19 AM »

yeah, by "Persian" I think they mean "using some Persian flavors."
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morgan
Registered user

Posts: 3614


« Reply #340 on: Feb 08, 2007, 02:49:18 AM »

Quote from: "swilkes"
Do you or anyone else in Korea (morgan, right?) know how to prepare jobchae (alt spelling I've seen: chap chae) noodles? I've had them at restaurants, but I'm afraid to cook them at home for fear of overcooking & creating a sticky mess. I've had poor luck with rice noodles in my kitchen, so I'm wary of trying out yam noodles.


I'm a little ashamed to admit it, but I find most Korean food absolutely vile.  I'm not the one to be asking for recipes in this subject, sorry!  I don't eat seafood or spicy food, so that rules out about 99% of the dishes in Korea.  I know it's horrible to move to another country and not partake in their local cuisine, but I tried!  Seafood smells like rotting death, and acid reflux disease makes me unable to tolerate the spiciness of most Korean dishes.  It is sad.  Sad
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theartlessmonster
Registered user

Posts: 5178


« Reply #341 on: Feb 08, 2007, 01:29:35 PM »

Quote from: "Bernard"
I am certifiably Iranian and I have never seen that type of cake before. I bet it smells great, though it sounds like a lot of ingredients used in Iranian food all just shoved together haphazardly into a cake.


yeah, the description is this...

"This chiffon cake filled with rose-scented whipped cream is inspired by the aromatics found in Persian, Turkish, and Indian confections. Cardamom seeds have more flavor than the ground powder and are like little explosions of spice in the cake."

I think I can do the cake its the rose petals that are still at issue, and I love that part, I'm going to a small gourmet market in a bit see if they have any thoughts on the organic rose petals.
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Nick Ink
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Posts: 7018


« Reply #342 on: Feb 08, 2007, 02:49:34 PM »

Quote from: "swilkes"

Sounds good. I've been obsessing over Korean food lately. Do you or anyone else in Korea (morgan, right?) know how to prepare jobchae (alt spelling I've seen: chap chae) noodles? I've had them at restaurants, but I'm afraid to cook them at home for fear of overcooking & creating a sticky mess. I've had poor luck with rice noodles in my kitchen, so I'm wary of trying out yam noodles.


This is a great site for Korean recipes...

http://www.koreankitchen.com/

But oddly, no glass noodle dish there. Hold on, here are a couple...

http://www.koreaneats.com/japchae.htm

http://www.recipezaar.com/160813

I couldn't say which one is better though. It's all I can do to boil an egg most days.
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Greg Nog
Registered user

Posts: 21629


« Reply #343 on: Feb 11, 2007, 04:25:26 PM »

I threw a bunch of stuff into the slow-cooker to make what will hopefully be a fairly kick-ass lentil stew.  

I wrote down the recipe, but I won't post it here, since I'm not sure how good this is gonna turn out.  I kinda just made it up as I went along, basing it partly on the lentil soup recipe from Joy of Cooking, partly on some Ethiopian recipe I found on the internet, and partly on whatever ingredients I happened to have in my kitchen today.  EXPERIMENTAL!
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diesel_powered
Registered user

Posts: 19210


« Reply #344 on: Feb 11, 2007, 05:43:13 PM »

I mastered that whole British egg-in-toast thing today. I feel pretty special.

Of course, now I need to get a star-shaped cookie cutter so I can have ROCK STAR EGGS!
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Quote
she had me at "let's make a sandwich"
theartlessmonster
Registered user

Posts: 5178


« Reply #345 on: Feb 11, 2007, 06:15:21 PM »

I'm making this

http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2007/02/polenta-lasagna-with-portabellas-and.html

Polenta Lasagna!

Course minus the basil and pepper and I substituted Spinach for the Kale.
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Greg Nog
Registered user

Posts: 21629


« Reply #346 on: Feb 11, 2007, 07:06:25 PM »

Quote from: "theartlessmonster"
Course minus the basil and pepper


*slowly shakes head in disgust*

Aside from that, though, way to go!  That looks mighty tasty.

And diesel, I never thought about the whole egg-in-shape-of-thing inside toast before... Now I kinda want to make a ducky-shaped toad-in-the-hole.
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silentsigh89
Registered user

Posts: 3073


« Reply #347 on: Feb 11, 2007, 07:16:40 PM »

I had to look up what you guys were talking about up there, and, um.

http://www.paigeburns.com/blog/?cat=7

look at how many names they have for it! I think I would probably stick with "commie in a cage" if I were to cook them.

...which I might!
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YojimboMonkey
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Posts: 12034


« Reply #348 on: Feb 11, 2007, 07:51:34 PM »

They're the first thing I ever learned to cook, and we always called them "hobo eggs."
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Greg Nog
Registered user

Posts: 21629


« Reply #349 on: Feb 11, 2007, 08:06:15 PM »

Quote from: "YojimboMonkey"
"hobo eggs."


Whoa.  To me, this phrase suggests a certain Lovecraftian kind of terror... pale whitish globes that collect mildew in the corner of the basement...unremarkable and undisturbed for years...  Until the Great Awakening, when they burst open, revealing bedraggled bearded train-hoppers of every stripe, all thirsting for blood and cheap rye.
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