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658143 Posts in 9262 Topics by 3396 Members Latest Member: - vlozan86 Most online today: 51 - most online ever: 494 (Jul 01, 2007, 02:59:53 PM)
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Author Topic: they've shown this on both screens: your next movie thread  (Read 71221 times)
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Andrew_TSKS
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« Reply #100 on: Dec 30, 2007, 01:53:01 AM »

so uh, i've got nothing more to say about that whole abortion in movies issue, but i did see eastern promises tonight. i liked it! it was better than a history of violence, and shows that cronenberg's turn towards gangster movies has not taken him away from his fascination with depictions of gore. there was this one crazy scene, trying not to ruin it, but there were knives. it was brutal. i loved it. i also really liked the layered nature of the plot, which is always a big selling point for me in crime movies/novels. i'm glad this one didn't disappoint on bringing that element in. dudes, if you like brutal gangster movies with an interesting human element, you owe it to yourselves to see this one. and someone i saw it with didn't like history of violence at all, and she really enjoyed eastern promises, so don't let a possible dislike of that movie deter you either.
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lastclearchance
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Posts: 1923


« Reply #101 on: Dec 30, 2007, 03:29:12 AM »

Death of Mr. Lazarescu would be up in my "best of list," too, but I could've seen it in 2006

so I rented this as soon as it was on DVD, but I was not expecting what I got, and after a very very slow first twenty minutes I lost interest. Does it stay that slow? Does it get really interesting? Was there a lot going on in that first twenty minutes that I wasn't getting because I expected a different kind of black comedy?

I mean I really want to give it another shot if it's worth it, but I remember checking the timecode on the DVD player (which I really do far too often. That, and my tendency, when watching alone, to pause, or even sometimes put subtitles on and mute, scenes I find really uncomfortable, are my two bad DVD-watching habits) and realizing that I had more than two hours to go, and giving up.

Have you seen 12:08 East of Bucharest? Any comments on that? Is it reductive of me to compare the two because they are somewhat contemporaneous and both from the same country? (I would lump 4 Months... in too but you haven't seen it yet, right? I have seen neither that nor 12:08.)

Also, I'm not exaggerating about my absolute inability to remember movie endings. It's a little disconcerting, but also sometimes a plus, because I can rewatch things and still relive the tension/mystery/uncertainty/etc.

I occasionally forget whole movies but by the time I'm partway through I remember everything.

I also remember reading an interview with Meryl Streep in which she is asked if she ever forgets having been in a film and she responds that she never forgets being in a film but sometimes she forgets what her character does in a film. At which point the interviewer cheekily suggests as an example, "What choice does Sophie make?" and she responds "No. Some things you don't forget." Or something.
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hannah
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« Reply #102 on: Dec 30, 2007, 09:47:27 AM »

re: lazarescu, it remains slow but I had the advantage of seeing it in the theater; and I don't think something being slows precludes it from being interesting, but I agree that it makes it hard to watch on DVD.

re: abortion, I'm behind on lptj -- has someone mentioned fast times at ridgemont high?
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coldforge
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« Reply #103 on: Dec 30, 2007, 11:21:49 AM »

Have you seen 12:08 East of Bucharest? Any comments on that? Is it reductive of me to compare the two because they are somewhat contemporaneous and both from the same country? (I would lump 4 Months... in too but you haven't seen it yet, right? I have seen neither that nor 12:08.)

It was good. Not terribly earthshaking, but entertaining. It helps if you have a hard-on for the Romanian language.
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l'era del terzo mondo.
nonotyet
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Posts: 7691


« Reply #104 on: Dec 30, 2007, 01:12:49 PM »

This Post Only Kind Of Belongs Here:

I am going to see No Country For Old Men tonight. WITH A BOY. It is A SECOND DATE, I THINK, KIND OF, MAYBE. And what I want to know is, and I read the book so I should really know this but it has been a while: and also please note that I have the lowest tolerance for blood and violence and being scared/surprised of any human being ever (the latest example of this being that after I watched Carrie I was so freaked out that I couldn't be alone): is it all gory? Will I be cowering into this guy's shirt sleeve? Is that why he is taking me to see it? ack
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #105 on: Dec 30, 2007, 01:24:01 PM »

It is gory, but not as bad as everyone's made it out to be. There are a few scenes right at the beginning that will probably make you flinch, but really the blood and gore lessen as the film goes on.
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think 'on the road.'
jess
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« Reply #106 on: Dec 30, 2007, 01:47:47 PM »

Also, I don't think it's impossible to make a movie about someone who does get an abortion and have it be good. In fact, it might be a hell of a lot more interesting if done well. For that matter, while not exactly the same thing, anyone remember Citizen Ruth, with Laura Dern as a pregnant drug addict who gets caught in the middle of both lobbies? It manages to brilliantly satirize both sides of the issue in ways that I thought were pretty spot on and darkly funny.

Agreed with all of the above, but am I correct in remembering that Laura Dern doesn't actually get the abortion in CR? I have a terrible memory for film endings, and any response to this might need to use spoiler-whiting, but IIRC the film somewhat skirts the matter.

she has a miscarriage (presumably from paint-huffing)

I vaguely tried to allude to that by saying it wasn't exactly a movie about getting an abortion, but I didn't want to give it away either. But the way the film deals with the whole issue (spoiler vision just in case) somehow fails to seem like skirting it exactly, more as trying to maintain its point of satirizing both sides' efforts to politicize her body.
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girl
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« Reply #107 on: Dec 30, 2007, 10:35:37 PM »

No End in Sight is a documentary about the mess we've made in Iraq. It doesn't really get in depth into the well-covered ground of how we got into the war in the first place, but instead concentrates on the decisions we've made to handle the aftermath and the repercussions those decisions have had. It's entertaining and extremely informative.
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Little Sixes Little Nines
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Posts: 1493


« Reply #108 on: Dec 31, 2007, 03:52:06 AM »

So, I liked the Golden Compass. A lot. Actually, I kinda loved it. Mind you, I read the book when I was 9 or so, and don't really remember it. I think they cut off the end though. Did they? Didn't they?
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jebreject
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« Reply #109 on: Dec 31, 2007, 11:38:40 AM »

They did. The fact that they did that was one of the few things I liked about that movie. (Setting up false hope; if the sequel ever gets made, it's going to start with sheer brutality)
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #110 on: Dec 31, 2007, 11:39:41 AM »

That flopped big time, right?
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think 'on the road.'
jebreject
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« Reply #111 on: Dec 31, 2007, 11:47:46 AM »

think so, yeah.
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Andrew_TSKS
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« Reply #112 on: Dec 31, 2007, 12:25:48 PM »

i saw "the kingdom" yesterday. it was a really great movie. not your average stupid rah-rah america action movie, it was more like a police procedural with a shitload of politics thrown in, at least up until the big crazy ending. i was actually very impressed with the opening computer-animation sequence, which basically gave a crash course in saudi arabia's relationship to the u.s. and to oil, in the space of about 3 minutes or however long it took to run the credits. it was pretty accurate and informative for the short amount of time spent on it, too. i learned maybe one thing i didn't already know, but for people who are just ignorant action-movie viewers, it probably helped the context a lot. also, i liked how the movie was edited like a documentary. rather than any dialogue to establish who characters are, there is just a caption next to them giving their name and their position the first time they're onscreen, and it just rolls from there. i'm sure there was a lot of exposition that this enabled the director to skip, therefore allowing more time to shoehorn in the complex plot details without glossing over any of them. so yeah, very well put together, very entertaining, very intense, and while i don't want to give anything away, the ending was defnintely not one that provided any sort of pat answer to the larger situation that the incident in the movie is part of. which made it more realistic and therefore i liked it better than i might have if it had just resolved everything in a feel-good manner.
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I just want to be myself and I want you to love me for who I am.
elpollodiablo
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« Reply #113 on: Dec 31, 2007, 01:39:23 PM »

So I just watched the Kingdom which is the type of movie I would never see were it not for the fact that I can download this tripe for free. I was surprised by the two small FNL cameos early in the film (Lyla and Coach Taylor), and then struck by the quality of the direction (quality here as a relative term, you understand) and the Explosions In the Sky-esque score (from Danny Elfman, incidentally). I didn't realize until the end of the picture that it was directed by Peter Berg.
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think 'on the road.'
auto-da-fey
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Posts: 9495


« Reply #114 on: Jan 01, 2008, 04:01:21 PM »

I finally saw No Country for Old Men, at the $3 theater. I liked it a lot, though I think the discussion here skewed it for me in such a way that I feel having read the book would have enriched it further. But Kelly Macdonald wasn't in the book, so maybe it evens out. Also I was surprised to see that fucking Three Doors Down National Guard recruitment music video that I just bitched about pop up beforehand, though it was kind of nice the way it elicited a rousing chorus of booing from the crowd. Glad to see tax dollars at work trying to inspire Coen Brothers fans to enlist, I'm sure that's having much success.
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auto-da-fey
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« Reply #115 on: Jan 01, 2008, 04:05:42 PM »

Also: Equlibrium. Had anyone asked me about this title, I'd have said it was probably an Alan Rudolph film with Matthew Modine in it. Maybe it is, I'm not checking. But this particular Equilibrium is a 2002 SF film with Christian Bale running through some shameless thefts from 1984, Brave New World, The Matrix, and probably a generous hodgepodge of the SF canon that slipped past me. Seriously derivative stuff, but somehow it manages to be pretty good, maybe because Bale tends to have that effect. I think Milly likes this; my lady loved it. 
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auto-da-fey
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« Reply #116 on: Jan 01, 2008, 04:13:08 PM »

And: Floundering. This movie rocked my world back in the mid-90s, embodying this vision of Gen-X urban slacker ennui that seemed so enthralling to me, stuck in the small-town midwest. I've seen it several times, but none since moving to L.A., where it's set, seven years ago, and I sort of feared that it would turn out to be hackneyed navel-gazing drivel and tarnish my cherished memories of it. Which was exactly what happened, what with James LeGros riding his bike around Venice delivering aimless interior monologues before smoking some crack and joining an imaginary revolution headed by street people. It's a fairly awful movie, full of obnoxious mid-90s indie cliches, but even despite all that, parts of it still resonate with me--scenes where LeGros obsessively watches videotapes of the riots (this was made about a year after them) and then drives around the burned remnants of South Central are really captivating.
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dieblucasdie
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« Reply #117 on: Jan 01, 2008, 07:48:58 PM »

I liked Juno a lot.  I don't think it was pro-life at all.  In fact, I was happy with the way the decision was portrayed, especially in comparison to Knocked Up.  Like pollo, I was expecting it to be much more precious and twee, but really it was pretty straight-forward.  Mainly because Ellen Page was channeling Lindsey from "Freaks & Geeks" the whole damn time. 
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elpollodiablo
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« Reply #118 on: Jan 01, 2008, 07:49:39 PM »

Drank the kool aid huh
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think 'on the road.'
dieblucasdie
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« Reply #119 on: Jan 01, 2008, 07:53:09 PM »

I suppose.  I definitely went into it with the same mindset you have about it, and was pleasantly surprised.  99% of the comedy is just based on one-liners, not on the deadpan hipster Wes Andersonish posturing like I expected.

Also I expected to be annoyed by the Kimya Dawson action, too, but they just use her two or three of her least annoying songs, and the rest of the soundtrack is Belle and Sebastian.  Could be worse.
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he was basically your only chance at making the world love you.
elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #120 on: Jan 01, 2008, 07:59:57 PM »

I'm willing to give it a shot and be completely amazed/surprised. It's happened before. It's just not often that a film that sounds so completely repugnant turns out to tickle my fancy.

Aren't there a lot of those awful slowmo tracking shots set to indie music tho?
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think 'on the road.'
jebreject
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Posts: 27071


« Reply #121 on: Jan 01, 2008, 08:05:30 PM »

Nm I'm not seeing it if there's that much Belle and Sebastian on the soundtrack
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morgan
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Posts: 3614


« Reply #122 on: Jan 01, 2008, 08:06:22 PM »

I watched Sicko last night.  It made me feel so depressed, angry and hopeless that I couldn't even sleep.

I'm not even going to rant about it, but.  So pissed off right now, and so scared to live in America again.
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elpollodiablo
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Posts: 32624


« Reply #123 on: Jan 01, 2008, 08:07:11 PM »

Really when the foremost reason to go to a movie is Michael Cera, you're better off staying home and watching Arrested Development reruns
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think 'on the road.'
jess
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Posts: 3571


« Reply #124 on: Jan 01, 2008, 08:17:23 PM »

Forget Michael Cera, the foremost reason to see that movie is Allison Janney. No one (except Dave apparently) gives her the appreciation she deserves.

I may be biased--I do have West Wing on in the background at the moment after all--but she really did kick ass in the movie.
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